The need for ethics and interdisciplinary research is becoming more apparent, and RFPs and funding opportunities are starting to reflect that. We are hard at work searching out funding opportunities that include an ethical component, and we can help write the proposals and conduct the research. If any of these RFPs interest you, please contact us - and return often, as we will update this on a weekly basis.

The Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) Regular Research Program (R01)

Granting Institution: National Institute of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: varies
Due Dates: February 5, June 5, October 5
Expiration Date: January 8, 2011

Description:
This FOA is designed to encourage research projects that anticipate, analyze and address the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of the discovery and use of new information and technologies resulting from human genomic research. Of particular interest are studies that examine issues and, where appropriate, develop policy options in the following areas: 1) the translation of genomic information to improved human health; 2) the conduct of genomic research; 3) intellectual property issues surrounding access to and use of genomic information; 4) non-medical applications of genomic technologies and information; 5) the impact of genomics on concepts of race, ethnicity, kinship and individual and group identity; 6) the implications of uncovering genetic contributions to not only disease, but also 'normal' human traits and behaviors; and 7) the ethical boundaries for the uses of genomics.

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The Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) Small Research Program (R03)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $100,000 over two years in four modules of $25,000 each
Due Dates: February 16, June 16, October 16
Expiration Date: January 8, 2011

Description:
This FOA is designed to encourage research projects that anticipate, analyze and address the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of the discovery and use of new information and technologies resulting from human genomic research. Of particular interest are studies that examine issues and, where appropriate, develop policy options in the following areas: 1) the translation of genomic information to improved human health; 2) the conduct of genomic research; 3) intellectual property issues surrounding access to and use of genomic information; 4) non-medical applications of genomic technologies and information; 5) the impact of genomics on concepts of race, ethnicity, kinship and individual and group identity; 6) the implications of uncovering genetic contributions to not only disease, but also 'normal' human traits and behaviors; and 7) the ethical boundaries for the uses of genomics.

This Small Research Grant program announcement is specifically designed to: 1) encourage the development of small, focused research projects by legal, historical, ethics, humanities, social sciences and behavioral scholars; 2) support exploratory studies that may provide preliminary findings or pilot data for larger research proposals; 3) support the secondary analysis of existing data; 4) support the development of new methodologies; and 5) stimulate and facilitate the entry of promising new investigators into ELSI Research.

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Research on Ethical Issues in Human Subjects Research (R01)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: varies
Due Dates: February 5, June 5, October 5
Expiration Date: May 8, 2011

Description:
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) solicits research project grant applications (R01) addressing ethical issues that accompany the conduct of research involving human subjects. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to solicit research addressing the ethical challenges of human subjects research in order to optimize the protection of human subjects and enhance the ethical conduct of human subjects research.

Recent developments in biomedical and behavioral research which include the rapid growth of new interventions and technologies, increasing involvement of foreign populations in human subjects research, and concerns about financial conflicts of interest among researchers, challenge investigators' abilities to interpret and apply the regulations. Other situations (e.g., research with vulnerable populations, research on stigmatizing diseases or conditions) may present difficulties for identifying strategies, procedures, and/or techniques that will enhance/ensure the ethical involvement of human subjects in research. Thus, research on ethical issues in human subjects research is necessary to enhance interpretation and application of ethical principles and regulatory requirements.

The research design for studies on ethical issues in human subjects research should be appropriate to the nature of the project(s) proposed and the disciplines involved. Given the conceptual and methodological complexity of many of these research questions, interdisciplinary and collaborative projects are encouraged, particularly those involving clinical researchers, ethicists, and behavioral/social scientists.

In conducting research on ethical issues in human subjects research, different conceptual frameworks for ethics (e.g., principlism, deontology, utilitarianism, rights, ethics of care, etc.) exist and may provide presuppositions and theoretical foundations from which bioethical questions can be formulated and tested. The questions and strategies for testing these issues must be consistent with existing Federal requirements. Currently, research supported by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS – which includes NIH) follows the Code of Federal Regulations – Protection of Human Subjects. This FOA seeks applications for empirical research that address the ethical challenges of research involving human subjects with the goal of optimizing protections. The NIH is also issuing FOAs on the same topics using two other grant mechanisms: the R03 and R21, which will support conceptual as well as empirical research.

Research on Ethical Issues in Human Subjects Research (R03)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $100,000 over two years in four modules of $25,000 each
Due Dates: February 16, June 16, October 16
Expiration Date: May 8, 2011

Description:
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) solicits Small Grant (R03) applications addressing ethical issues that accompany the conduct of research involving human subjects. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to solicit research addressing the ethical challenges of human subjects research in order to optimize the protection of human subjects and enhance the ethical conduct of human subjects research.

Recent developments in biomedical and behavioral research which include the rapid growth of new interventions and technologies, increasing involvement of foreign populations in human subjects research, and concerns about financial conflicts of interest among researchers, challenge investigators' abilities to interpret and apply the regulations. Other situations (e.g., research with vulnerable populations, research on stigmatizing diseases or conditions) may present difficulties for identifying strategies, procedures, and/or techniques that will enhance/ensure the ethical involvement of human subjects in research. Thus, research on ethical issues in human subjects research is necessary to enhance interpretation and application of ethical principles and regulatory requirements.

The research design for studies on ethical issues in human subjects research should be appropriate to the nature of the project(s) proposed and the disciplines involved. Given the conceptual and methodological complexity of many of these research questions, interdisciplinary and collaborative projects are encouraged, particularly those involving clinical researchers, ethicists, and behavioral/social scientists.

In conducting research on ethical issues in human subjects research, different conceptual frameworks for ethics (e.g., principlism, deontology, utilitarianism, rights, ethics of care, etc.) exist and may provide presuppositions and theoretical foundations from which bioethical questions can be formulated and tested. The questions and strategies for testing these issues must be consistent with existing Federal requirements.

Research on Ethical Issues in Human Subjects Research (R21)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $275,000 over an R21 two-year period
Due Dates: February 16, June 16, October 16
Expiration Date: May 8, 2011

Description:
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) solicits Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant applications (R21) addressing ethical issues that accompany the conduct of research involving human subjects. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to solicit research addressing the ethical challenges of human subjects research in order to optimize the protection of human subjects and enhance the ethical conduct of human subjects research.

Recent developments in biomedical and behavioral research which include the rapid growth of new interventions and technologies, increasing involvement of foreign populations in human subjects research, and concerns about financial conflicts of interest among researchers, challenge investigators' abilities to interpret and apply the regulations. Other situations (e.g., research with vulnerable populations, research on stigmatizing diseases or conditions) may present difficulties for identifying strategies, procedures, and/or techniques that will enhance/ensure the ethical involvement of human subjects in research. Thus, research on ethical issues in human subjects research is necessary to enhance interpretation and application of ethical principles and regulatory requirements.

The research design for studies on ethical issues in human subjects research should be appropriate to the nature of the project(s) proposed and the disciplines involved. Given the conceptual and methodological complexity of many of these research questions, interdisciplinary and collaborative projects are encouraged, particularly those involving clinical researchers, ethicists, and behavioral/social scientists.

In conducting research on ethical issues in human subjects research, different conceptual frameworks for ethics (e.g., principlism, deontology, utilitarianism, rights, ethics of care, etc.) exist and may provide presuppositions and theoretical foundations from which bioethical questions can be formulated and tested. The questions and strategies for testing these issues must be consistent with existing Federal requirements.

The evolution and vitality of the biomedical sciences require a constant infusion of new ideas, techniques, and points of view. These may differ substantially from current thinking or practice and may not yet be supported by substantial preliminary data. By using the R21 mechanism, the NIH seeks to foster the introduction of novel scientific ideas, model systems, tools, agents, targets, and technologies that have the potential to substantially advance biomedical research.

The R21 mechanism is intended to encourage new exploratory and developmental research projects. For example, such projects could assess the feasibility of a novel area of investigation or a new experimental system that has the potential to enhance health-related research. Another example could include the unique and innovative use of an existing methodology to explore a new scientific area. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

Granting Institution: National Science Foundation (NSF)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Due Dates: February 1, August 1
Award Types:
STS provides a range of funding opportunities designed to support the full spectrum of research, educational, and scholarly activities undertaken by scholars working on science, technology and society. The Program urges potential investigators to discuss their proposals with one of the affiliated Program Officers in advance of submission. This program solicitation covers the eight modes of support:

• Scholars Awards (up to $90,000)
• Standard Research Grants and Grants for Collaborative Research (up to $400,000)
• Postdoctoral Fellowships (up to $50,000)
• Professional Development Fellowships (up to $90,000)
• Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants (up to $10,000 for Research in North America or $15,000 for International Research)
• Small Grants for Training and Research (up to $130,000)
• Conference and Workshop Support (up to $25,000)
• Other Grant Opportunities

Description:
The Science, Technology, and Society Program (STS) supports research and associated activities that examine the relationships among science, technology, engineering, and society.It considers proposals that examine historical, philosophical, social, cultural, policy, and ethical questions that arise in connection with science and technology, and their respective interactions with society. It is committed to the importance and intrinsic value of scholarly research conducted by individual investigators; to qualitative, interpretive, and quantitative research; and to analytical, critical, theoretical, empirical, ethnographic, and comparative studies.

STS considers proposals in four broad, overlapping, and mutually complementary areas of research described below. It emphasizes analytical and interpretive studies that examine scientific and technological theory and practice. Studies in this field may also explore the impact of science and technology on society and how ethical, intellectual, cultural, and social factors influence science and technology. Questions pertaining to knowledge production and its effects, both within the scientific community and beyond, are also central to STS. Within STS a variety of analytical tools, perspectives, and research methodologies are used.

Studies of ethics and values in science and technology examine normative issues in the conduct of science and the development and implementation of technology. Proposals focus on how ethical issues and values interconnect with science and technology, and how norms and values institutionalized in science and technology engage with society. Proposals in this area of STS may examine how ethics in scientific and technological research are defined, and by whom.

Studies in history and philosophy of science and technology use the traditions and tools of history and philosophy to examine intellectual, theoretical, socio-cultural, and material dimensions of science and technology. Proposals in this area of STS engage in analytical, critical, reflective, and interpretive modes of study of the scientific and technological enterprises both past and present. History is broadly conceived to include social, cultural, institutional, and personal contexts. Philosophy may focus on a variety of modes such as providing epistemological, methodological, conceptual, or metaphysical perspectives on a particular theory or conceptual or technological innovation, or on science or technology more broadly.

Social studies of science and technology draw upon the social and behavioral sciences including anthropology, sociology, economics, political science, and science and technology studies. Proposals in this area examine the interconnections of science, technology, and society. Supported research will bring the tools and theories of the social sciences to bear on such issues as how science and technology function in different societies, and how culture and society and science, technology, and engineering shape each other. A variety of methodologies are supported including ethnography, surveys, network analysis, interviews, modeling and theorizing, content analysis, and archival exploration.

Studies in policy on science and technology include research on social and strategic choices, especially policy choices, that influence knowledge production and innovation and their effects, and on the influences of scientific and technical knowledge and innovation on policy. Proposals in this area typically draw upon methodologies of the social sciences including qualitative, interpretive, and quantitative approaches.

The four areas that constitute the core of STS are regarded by the program as mutually complementary. STS encourages the submission of hybrid proposals that strive to integrate research involving two or more of these core areas. Each proposal is evaluated by an interdisciplinary panel consisting of experts from each of the core areas. Doing so facilitates the assessment of different disciplinary dimensions of hybrid proposals.

Enduring Questions

Granting Institution: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $25,000
Due Date: September 15, 2010

Description:
The Enduring Questions grant program supports a faculty member's development of a new course that will foster intellectual community through the study of an enduring question. This course will encourage undergraduate students and a teacher to grapple with a fundamental question addressed by the humanities, and to join together in a deep and sustained program of reading in order to encounter influential thinkers over the centuries and into the present day.

What is an enduring question? The following list is neither prescriptive nor exhaustive but serves to illustrate.
• What is the good life?
• What is happiness?
• What is friendship?
• What is beauty?
• Is there a human nature, and, if so, what is it?
• What is the relationship between humans and the natural world?
• How do science and ethics relate to one another?
• Is there such a thing as right and wrong? Good and evil?
• What is good government?

Enduring questions are, to an overarching degree, predisciplinary. They are questions to which no discipline or field or profession can lay an exclusive claim. In many cases they predate the formation of the academic disciplines themselves. Enduring questions can be tackled by reflective individuals regardless of their chosen vocations, areas of expertise, or personal backgrounds. They are questions that have more than one plausible or compelling answer. They have long held interest for young people, and they allow for a special, intense dialogue across generations. The Enduring Questions grant program will help promote such dialogue in today's undergraduate environment.

An Enduring Questions grant supports the development of a new undergraduate humanities course that must be taught at least twice during the grant period. The grant supports the work of a faculty member in designing, preparing, and assessing the course. It may also be used for ancillary activities that enhance faculty-student intellectual community, such as visits to museums and artistic or cultural events. An Enduring Questions course may be taught by a faculty member from any department or discipline in the humanities or by a faculty member outside the humanities (e.g., astronomy, biology, economics, law, mathematics, medicine, psychology), so long as humanities sources are central to the course.

FAQ's

Teaching Development Fellowships

Granting Institution: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $21,000
Due Dates: September 30, 2010

Description:
Teaching Development Fellowships (TDF) support college and university teachers pursuing research aimed specifically at improving their undergraduate teaching. The program has three broad goals: 1) to improve the quality of humanities education in the United States; 2) to strengthen the link between research and teaching in the humanities; and 3) to foster excellence in undergraduate instruction.

Projects must improve an existing undergraduate course that has been taught in at least THREE different terms and will continue to be taught by the applicant. Proposals for new courses or for mere course preparation will NOT be considered. The research project must be closely related to the applicant's core interests as an interpreter of the humanities.

The research undertaken as a part of the project may involve engaging with fundamental texts or sources, exploring related subjects or academic disciplines, or cultivating neglected areas of learning. Projects may entail the acquisition of new language or digital skills as a means to performing the proposed research. The project must be directed primarily towards course improvement, not scholarly publication.

Research in any area of the humanities is welcome.

FAQ's

Collaborative Research Grants

Granting Institution: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $25,000-$100,000 a year for up to three years
Due Dates: October 28, 2010
Description:
Collaborative Research Grants support original research undertaken by a team of two or more scholars or research coordinated by an individual scholar that, because of its scope or complexity, requires additional staff and resources beyond the individual's salary.

Eligible projects include:
• research that significantly adds to knowledge and understanding in the humanities;
• conferences on topics of major importance in the humanities that will benefit ongoing research;
• archaeological projects that include the interpretation and communication of results (projects may encompass excavation, materials analysis, laboratory work, field reports, and preparation of interpretive monographs);
• research that uses the knowledge, methods, and perspectives of the humanities to enhance understanding of science, technology, medicine, and the social sciences.

These grants support full-time or part-time activities for periods of one to three years. Support is available for various combinations of scholars, consultants, and research assistants; project-related travel; field work; applications of information technology; and technical support and services. All grantees are expected to communicate the results of their work to the appropriate scholarly and public audiences.

FAQ's

Initiative to Maximize Research Education in Genomics (R25)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $50,000 a year for up to three years for courses; up to $300,000 a year for up to five years for research education and training initiatives linked to parent grant applications
Due Dates: * January 25, May 25, September 25
*letter of intent due thirty days prior to application due date
Expiration/Closing Date: September 26, 2012

Description:
The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) invites R25 applications in response to two important initiatives: (1) short, advanced level courses that are intended to disseminate new laboratory techniques, methods, analyses related to the mission of the NHGRI and (2) research education and training initiatives that are linked to specific NHGRI research initiatives, such as Centers of Excellence in Genomic Science and large-scale sequencing and database grants.

Courses. Genomics has stimulated and continues to stimulate the development of powerful new laboratory techniques, methods and analyses, and biomedical research would benefit from the rapid, widespread dissemination of these methods to the general research community. Short (a few days to two week) courses have been a very effective means of doing so.
Genomics has also addressed the many ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) that have been raised by genomics research. Discussion and dissemination of new and emerging ELSI issues would keep the community updated and alerted to issues that should be anticipated in genomics research involving human participants.
Applications are encouraged for courses designed to address either of these needs. Courses designed to cross-train genomic researchers and ELSI scholars are particularly encouraged. Course offerings should be targeted to individuals in careers at the doctoral level and beyond; are expected to be hosted by academic or research institutions where the staff and faculty are experienced in training; include as faculty established investigators or scholars actively working in the area of instruction; and should typically be one to two weeks in length and offered annually, although other terms may be acceptable. Applicants may request up to three years of support.

Research Education and Training. The National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research and the National Human Genome Research Institute want to ensure that the next generation of genome scientists will have adequate representation from populations that are currently underrepresented in genomic science as researchers. Moreover, specific initiatives have been identified as preferred incubators for research education and training in genomics (http://www.genome.gov/10001707). Initiatives targeted to those at the undergraduate level and/or beyond, including the faculty level, are encouraged and will be given the highest priority. The main focus should be on ensuring that individuals: (a) successfully transition to the next career level; (b) remain in a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) field; (c) pursue doctoral degrees or advanced training in fields relevant to genomics; and (d) pursue careers in genomics. Examples of how these objectives can be accomplished include, but are not limited to, academic enhancement programs, appropriate laboratory experience; mentoring adequate for the career level; career development activities; enhancements in writing scientific papers and fellowship/grant applications; and developing scientific presentation and interviewing skills. The duration of the research education and training program must coincide with that of the parent grant application.
The types of research experiences that can be supported under this award include, but are not limited to: (1) short-term research experiences for undergraduate and graduate students; (2) up to two years of post baccalaureate research and academic support with the objective of transitioning to a F31 support for graduate school; (3) up to 24 months of graduate school support with the objective of transitioning to a F31; (4) up to 24 months of postdoctoral fellowship support with the objective of transitioning to a F32; and (5) research experiences for faculty to provide preliminary data for research grant applications. Exceptions to accommodate research experiences for high school students will only be made for competing continuations of the parent grant that have in the past supported such students. In such cases, support of high school students must represent less than 10 percent of total support requested.
The proposed research education and training initiative may complement other ongoing research training and education programs at the applicant institution, but the proposed educational experiences must be distinct from those research training and research education programs currently receiving federal support and provide added value. The R25 is not a substitute for an institutional research training program (T32) and can not be used to circumvent or supplement Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) mechanisms.

The NIH encourages all proposed programs to foster the participation of individuals from racial and ethnic groups underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral research, individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, individuals with disabilities, and women.

Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Bioethics

Granting Institution: The Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: two-year fellowship; stipends are based on past experience and the current US government schedule
Due Dates: December 30

Description:
The Department of Bioethics of the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, NIH, is offering a limited number of post-doctoral fellowship positions in bioethics.

The Department of Bioethics is committed to clinical teaching, consultation, and research. Fellows will participate in the activities and the intellectual life of the department and study ethical issues related to conduct of research, clinical practice, and health policy. Fellows will conduct their research under the guidance of senior faculty, participate in weekly bioethics seminars, case conferences, ethics consultations, and IRB deliberations, and have access to multiple educational opportunities at the NIH.

Applicants should have a PhD, MD, JD, or other advanced degree in a relevant field. Fellows will be selected on the basis of their previous academic or professional achievements, commitment to scholarship, and the contribution they are likely to make in the field of bioethics. No prior experience in bioethics is necessary.

Interested applicants should submit an application including a curriculum vitae, a brief statement describing their interests and goals for the fellowship (1,000 words or less), three letters of reference, copies of written or published work, and transcripts.

Visiting Scholar Program

Granting Institution: The Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Description:
The Department of Bioethics hosts one or more visiting scholars each year. The Department benefits visiting scholars with different experiences, disciplinary backgrounds, and perspectives in its midst -- "to stir the pot."

Although Visiting Scholars have a substantial track record of respected research and interests that bears on issues in bioethics, they need not have had any prior interest in bioethics. The Department invites expressions of interest in serving as a Visiting Scholar for Academic Years 2011 - 2012 and beyond.

Although Visiting Scholars have ample time to focus on their own research, Visiting Scholars are substantially engaged with the activities and members of the department. Most visiting scholars have spent at least three days a week on campus. Visiting Scholars attend the department's "joint seminar" (with Georgetown and George Washington), "works in progress," "journal club," and "Ethics Grand Rounds," and participate in the selection of fellows. Scholars make themselves reasonably available to Department faculty and fellows, often comment on manuscripts, and make one or two presentations on previous and/or current research.

Visiting Scholars are welcome to avail themselves of the numerous intellectual opportunities and resources available at NIH. They may be interested in learning about or participating in consultations or ethics committee discussions, attending IRB meetings, attending the department's course in bioethics for first-year fellows, attending the department's course in "The Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Human Subject Research," giving practice talks to the department, etc. Visiting Scholars may also find opportunities to collaborate with faculty or fellows on their own research.

The Department is generally able to fund one Visiting Scholar per academic year. Visiting Scholar positions may also be available to faculty on sabbatical who receive full or partial funding from their home institution.

Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE)

Granting Institution: National Science Foundation
Program Solicitation Website: http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf10586
Award: up to $250,000 over two years for Pathways & Knowledge Diffusion projects; up to $1,500,000 over three years for Empirical research projects; up to $2,500,000 over five years for Large Empirical research projects.
Due Date: November 15, 2010

Description:
The goals of the REESE program are: (1) to catalyze discovery and innovation at the frontiers of STEM learning, education, and evaluation; (2) to stimulate the field to produce high quality and robust research results through the progress of theory, method, and human resources; and (3) to coordinate and transform advances in education, learning research, and evaluation efforts. REESE pursues its mission by developing an interdisciplinary research portfolio focusing on core scientific questions of STEM learning in current and emerging learning contexts, both formal and informal, from childhood through adulthood, and from before school through to graduate school and beyond into the workforce. REESE places particular importance upon the involvement of young investigators in the projects, at doctoral, postdoctoral, and early career stages, as well as the involvement of STEM disciplinary experts. In addition, research questions related to educational research methodology and evaluation are central to the REESE activity.
This solicitation calls for four types of proposals: Pathways, Knowledge Diffusion, Empirical, and Large Empirical. All REESE proposals, regardless of their type, must be responsive to one of two broad topical strands, Emerging Research or Contextual Research, as described below.

Research on Emerging Topics in STEM Education
Emerging research that broadens knowledge in the field often challenges existing assumptions about learning and teaching within or across STEM disciplines. The REESE program is committed to supporting transformative education research in STEM education through novel answers to foundational questions about what STEM concepts can be learned, by whom, at what age, and how and where that can happen.
REESE seeks proposals that have the potential to transform existing fields of STEM learning and education through pioneering research that defies disciplinary boundaries in pursuit of emerging knowledge in STEM learning. Emerging Research proposals will seek to contribute to far-reaching and longer-term developments in knowledge and theory. Emerging Research proposals are limited to one or more of the following areas of inquiry:
1. Neural basis of STEM learning
2. Cognitive processes underlying STEM learning and teaching
3. Measurement, modeling, and methods for research and evaluation
4. Cyberlearning and teaching

Contextual Research Topics in STEM Education
The Contextual Research strand encourages proposals that address central problems and topics in STEM education, teaching and learning, and evaluation, for all age groups and in all settings--problems that must be addressed in order for substantial progress to be made in educating the STEM workforce of tomorrow and ensuring the STEM literacy of all. Research in this area is often multidisciplinary, drawing on the expertise of STEM content experts, STEM education researchers, cognitive and social scientists, computer scientists, and potentially those from other areas of praxis and scholarship. It may also draw on international research trends and theoretical perspectives.
In contrast to the Emerging Research strand, which is limited to specified topics, the Contextual Research strand of REESE offers two broad areas for transformative solutions to persistent problems: research on teaching and learning in formal and informal settings, and education policy studies and research on national initiatives on STEM. The REESE program expects that Contextual Research proposals will more typically address problems that are current and widely visible within STEM teaching and learning, with nearer-term, more-direct implications for use in the context of policy and practice than is the case for Emerging Research projects.

Eligible proposal types
This solicitation calls for four types of proposals:

Pathways Projects: Pathways projects relate to the "design, develop, and test" component of the DRL cycle of research and development. They are small-scale studies that include proof-of-concept studies, pilot studies, and feasibility studies-work that is on a path toward a major project (Synthesis, Empirical, or Large Scale Empirical) but that need to address critical issues or decisions before major projects can be formulated.

Knowledge Diffusion proposals: Knowledge diffusion projects are small grants for the synthesis of existing knowledge on a topic of critical importance to STEM learning, education, and/or evaluation, or for the diffusion of research-based knowledge. Synthesis proposals should identify areas where the knowledge base is sufficiently robust to support strong scientific claims, identify areas of importance to education research, evaluation or practice, and propose rigorous methods for synthesizing findings and drawing conclusions from a range of relevant literatures.

Empirical Research proposals: Empirical Research proposals should identify areas that have the potential for advancing discovery and innovation in STEM learning. These projects are designed to support the collection of new empirical data or to conduct secondary analyses from existing state, national or international databases. Such projects are expected to be based deeply in the STEM disciplines.

Large Empirical Research proposals: REESE will support a limited number of projects up to $2,500,000 for up to five years. Proposals must carefully justify why a budget of this size would be required to carry out the research. The proposals will generally involve teams of multi-disciplinary experts working on conceptually related projects. For example, one team could seek to develop a new behavioral measure of learning in a content area of particular STEM importance, while a second team studied the neural underpinnings of learning in the area. Other types of proposals that might be appropriate for a large award would be a longitudinal study of a large sample of participants, a randomized control trial of an intervention whose efficacy has been established in more limited conditions, or a study addressing replication or scale-up.

Introduction to REESE by Dr. Janice Earle
Abstracts of Recent Awards made through REESE

Environmental Sustainability

Granting Institution: National Science Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years. Average annual award size for the program is $100,000.
Full Proposal Window: August 15, 2010 – September 23, 2010; February 1, 2011 – March 3, 2011

Description:
The Environmental Sustainability program supports engineering research with the goal of promoting sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival. The long-term viability of natural capital is critical for many areas of human endeavor. Research in Environmental Sustainability typically considers long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics.

This program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions. There are four principal general research areas which are supported, but others can be proposed:
• Industrial Ecology
• Green Engineering
• Ecological Engineering
• Earth Systems Engineering

Topics of interest in Industrial Ecology include advancements in modeling such as life cycle assessment, materials flow analysis, input/output economic models, and novel metrics for measuring sustainable systems. Understanding materials flow and taking advantage of such understanding to substitute less toxic, longer lived materials are important areas for consideration. The effects of substituted materials on waste streams can be explored. Innovations in industrial ecology are encouraged. Engineering tools for estimating costs and ramifications of sustainable development must be developed, tested, and evaluated.

In Green Engineering, research is encouraged to advance the sustainability of chemical processes, other manufacturing processes, green buildings, and infrastructure. Many programs in the Engineering Directorate support research in environmentally benign manufacturing or chemical processes. The Environmental Sustainability program supports research that would affect more than one chemical or manufacturing process or that takes a systems or holistic approach to green engineering for infrastructure or green buildings. Of particular interest is the next generation of water and wastewater treatment that will dramatically decrease material and energy use, consider new paradigms for delivery of services, and promote longer life for engineered systems. Improvements in distribution and collection systems that will advance smart growth strategies and ameliorate effects of growth are research areas that are supported by Environmental Sustainability. Innovations in prevention and management of storm water, wastewater technology, indoor air quality, recycling and reuse of drinking water, and other green engineering techniques to support sustainable construction projects may also be fruitful areas for research.

Ecological Engineering topics should focus on the engineering aspects of restoring ecological function to natural systems. Engineering research in enhancement of natural capital to foster sustainable development is encouraged. Many communities are involved in stream restoration, revitalization of urban rivers, and rehabilitation of wetlands that require engineering input. What is the fundamental engineering knowledge that is necessary for ecological engineering to function sustainability?

Earth Systems Engineering considers aspects of large scale engineering research that involve mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, adaptation to climate change, and other global scale concerns.

All proposed research should be driven by engineering principles, and be presented explicitly in an environmental sustainability context. Proposals should include involvement in engineering research of at least one graduate student, as well as undergraduates. Incorporation of aspects of social, behavioral, and economic sciences is welcomed.

Social-Computational Systems (SoCS)

Granting Institution: National Science Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Program Solicitation Website: NSF 09-559
Award: up to $250,000 per year for up to 3 years
Due Date: August 31, 2010; Last Tuesday in August, Annually Thereafter

Description:
The Social-Computational Systems (SoCS) program seeks to reveal new understanding about the properties that systems of people and computers together possess, and to develop a practical understanding of the purposeful design of systems to facilitate socially intelligent computing. By better characterizing, understanding, and eventually designing for desired behaviors arising from computationally mediated groups of people at all scales, new forms of knowledge creation, new models of computation, new forms of culture, and new types of interaction will result. Further, the investigation of such systems and their emergent behaviors and desired properties will inform the design of future systems.

The SoCS program will support research in socially intelligent computing arising from human-computer partnerships that range in scale from a single person and computer to an Internet-scale array of machines and people. The program seeks to create new knowledge about the capabilities these partnerships can demonstrate - new affordances and new emergent behaviors, as well as unanticipated consequences and fundamental limits. The program also seeks to foster new ideas that support even greater capabilities for socially intelligent computing, such as the design and development of systems reflecting explicit knowledge about people's cognitive and social abilities, new models of collective, social, and participatory computing, and new algorithms that leverage the specific abilities of massive numbers of human participants.

The SoCS program seeks to capitalize upon the collaborative knowledge and research methods of investigators in the computational and human sciences, recognizing that researchers in computer science and related disciplines often focus on the limits and capabilities of computation in isolation from the people that use computation, while researchers in the social sciences often focus on the use of technology or the capabilities of people with limited impact on how such knowledge can influence the design of new technologies. Proposals that reflect collaborative efforts spanning computational and human centered approaches and perspectives are specifically encouraged.

Representative questions and research challenges of interest to the SoCS program include:
 • What design techniques and computational, technical, and social substrates and abstractions enable and facilitate the design of and fullest breadth of behaviors from socially intelligent computing systems? How can we design socially intelligent computing systems for desirable properties and values?
 • What methods are effective in studying socially intelligent computing, and how can we effectively compare various types of socially intelligent computing?
 • How can we better understand what types of behaviors and what new affordances can emerge or be demonstrated by socially intelligent computing? Can we model or parameterize such systems, helping us understand what is "computable" or what behaviors are achievable or unachievable by socially intelligent computing?
 • How does socially intelligent computing arise in scales ranging from a single person and computer to an Internet-scale cloud of machines and people? Can we model or parameterize such systems, helping us to understand what is "intelligence" when humans and computers are most effectively or integrally connected?
 • Can greater capabilities be achieved if our computational creations - whether as mediators between people, as tools wielded by people, or as equal or complementary participants with people - were explicitly designed with knowledge of the cognitive, social, cultural, and emotional factors that impact our behaviors?
 • How can we leverage unexpected behaviors of socially intelligent computing systems? Can we build systems that are robust to the vagary of motivations, calculation, and communication?
 • How are value systems embedded in the algorithms and collective participations and what form do they take? For example, volunteerism is a well-established and studied behavior among people, but what distinctive aspects feature strongly in socially intelligent computing where encyclopedia entries, software elements, and product reviews are created by millions of often anonymous, uncompensated people?
 • Communities are central to the lives of people as social creatures, but what distinctive aspects feature strongly in people playing together in virtual world games or socializing through the myriad Internet communities and social networking resources?
 • Are there general ways to harness those capabilities in which people currently outperform computers - such as image understanding - with complementary capabilities of computing to achieve behaviors that transcend those of people or computers in isolation?

The SoCS program does not seek to rebuild or incrementally improve on existing exemplary systems. Instead, SoCS is targeting a new horizon of computationally mediated human and machine interactions that reframe what it means to think, learn, compute, work, interact and play. Submissions must make clear how the proposed work would ultimately expand our body of knowledge about designing socially intelligent computing systems. Proposals that describe socially intelligent computing experiments designed to address contemporary economic and social issues are specifically encouraged.

Methodology and Measurement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (R01)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: varies
Due Dates: * February 5 / June 5 / October 5 *letter of intent due thirty days prior to application due date

Description:
The behavioral and social sciences offer significant, fundamental insights into the comprehensive understanding of human health, including disease etiology and treatment, and the promotion of health and well-being. To encourage the investigation of the impact of social and behavioral factors on health and disease, the participating Institutes and Centers (ICs) invite qualified researchers to submit research grant applications on methodology and measurement in the behavioral and social sciences. Methodology and measurement encompass research design, data collection techniques, measurement, and data analysis techniques. The goal of this program announcement is to encourage research that will improve the quality and scientific power of data collected in the behavioral and social sciences, using humans or animals, relevant to the missions of the NIH ICs. Research that addresses methodology and measurement issues in diverse populations, issues in studying sensitive behaviors, issues of ethics in research, issues related to confidential data and the protection of research subjects, and issues in developing interdisciplinary, multimethod, and multilevel approaches to behavioral and social science research is particularly encouraged, as are approaches that integrate behavioral and social science research with biomedical, physical, or computational science research or engineering. Because the focus of this program announcement is developing methodology, rather than addressing a single, health-related research question, applicants are encouraged to propose approaches that would be broadly applicable to basic or applied behavioral and social sciences research related to health.

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages applications addressing four general areas of methodology and measurement research in the social and behavioral sciences, including research design, data collection techniques, measurement, and data analysis. Within the broad spectrum of research defined by these areas, applicants are particularly encouraged (but are not required) to consider studies that address one or more of the following key issues:
 • Methodology and measurement issues in developing innovative interdisciplinary, multimethod, and multilevel research designs for use in behavioral and social science research, with special emphasis on both developing new technologies and addressing the analytical complexities associated with the integration of behavioral, social, and biological data.
 • Methodology and measurement issues in research relating to diverse populations, for example, populations that are distinctive by virtue of age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, culture, including culture-specific medical systems, socio-economic status, literacy, language, or disability.
 • Methodology and measurement issues in studying potentially sensitive behaviors, such as sexual behavior and abortion, and covert or illegal behaviors such as drug use, abuse, and violence.
 • Methodology and measurement issues that facilitate incorporating measures of social environment with genetic data or enhance bringing genetic measures into studies of social epidemiology.
 • Methodology and measurement issues concerning ethics in research, with emphasis on the topics of informed consent, assessment of risk and benefit, and selection and retention of subjects, and ensuring subjects' confidentiality.

Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches are strongly encouraged. Potential applicants are urged to explore the ideas and methods developed in social science and behavioral fields other than their own and to consider the development and integration of behavioral and social science measures with those of the biomedical, physical, or computational sciences or engineering. Consulting relevant literature and collaborating with colleagues from other disciplines may provide important opportunities for cross-fertilization in developing improved methodology and measurement.

Methodology and Measurement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (R21)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $275,000 over an R21 two-year period
Due Dates: * February 16 / June 16 / October 16 *letter of intent due thirty days prior to application due date
Expiration Date: September 8, 2011

Description:
The behavioral and social sciences offer significant, fundamental insights into the comprehensive understanding of human health, including disease etiology and treatment, and the promotion of health and well-being. To encourage the investigation of the impact of social and behavioral factors on health and disease, the participating Institutes and Centers (ICs) invite qualified researchers to submit research grant applications on methodology and measurement in the behavioral and social sciences. Methodology and measurement encompass research design, data collection techniques, measurement, and data analysis techniques. The goal of this program announcement is to encourage research that will improve the quality and scientific power of data collected in the behavioral and social sciences, using humans or animals, relevant to the missions of the NIH ICs. Research that addresses methodology and measurement issues in diverse populations, issues in studying sensitive behaviors, issues of ethics in research, issues related to confidential data and the protection of research subjects, and issues in developing interdisciplinary, multimethod, and multilevel approaches to behavioral and social science research is particularly encouraged, as are approaches that integrate behavioral and social science research with biomedical, physical, or computational science research or engineering. Because the focus of this program announcement is developing methodology, rather than addressing a single, health-related research question, applicants are encouraged to propose approaches that would be broadly applicable to basic or applied behavioral and social sciences research related to health.

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages applications addressing four general areas of methodology and measurement research in the social and behavioral sciences, including research design, data collection techniques, measurement, and data analysis. Within the broad spectrum of research defined by these areas, applicants are particularly encouraged (but are not required) to consider studies that address one or more of the following key issues:
 • Methodology and measurement issues in developing innovative interdisciplinary, multimethod, and multilevel research designs for use in behavioral and social science research, with special emphasis on both developing new technologies and addressing the analytical complexities associated with the integration of behavioral, social, and biological data.
 • Methodology and measurement issues in research relating to diverse populations, for example, populations that are distinctive by virtue of age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, culture, including culture-specific medical systems, socio-economic status, literacy, language, or disability.
 • Methodology and measurement issues in studying how dramatic changes in economic, social, environmental, physical, or political context affect human health and well-being, including developing new methods if older ones are no longer valid in the face of significant changes in populations and societies over the last several decades.
 • Methodology and measurement issues in studying potentially sensitive behaviors, such as sexual behavior and abortion, and covert or illegal behaviors such as drug use, abuse, and violence.
 • Methodology and measurement issues that facilitate incorporating measures of social environment with genetic data or enhance bringing genetic measures into studies of social epidemiology.
 • Methodology and measurement issues concerning ethics in research, with emphasis on the topics of informed consent, assessment of risk and benefit, and selection and retention of subjects, and ensuring subjects' confidentiality.

Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches are strongly encouraged. Potential applicants are urged to explore the ideas and methods developed in social science and behavioral fields other than their own and to consider the development and integration of behavioral and social science measures with those of the biomedical, physical, or computational sciences or engineering. Consulting relevant literature and collaborating with colleagues from other disciplines may provide important opportunities for cross-fertilization in developing improved methodology and measurement.

The evolution and vitality of the social, behavioral and biomedical sciences require a constant infusion of new ideas, techniques, and points of view. These may differ substantially from current thinking or practice and may not yet be supported by substantial preliminary data. By using the R21 mechanism, the NIH seeks to foster the introduction of novel scientific ideas, model systems, tools, agents, targets, and technologies that have the potential to substantially advance biomedical research.

The R21 mechanism is intended to encourage new exploratory and developmental research projects. For example, such projects could assess the feasibility of a novel area of investigation or a new experimental system that has the potential to enhance health-related research. Another example could include the unique and innovative use of an existing methodology to explore a new scientific area. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

Applications for R21 awards should describe projects distinct from those supported through the traditional R01 mechanism. For example, long-term projects, or projects designed to increase knowledge in a well-established area, will not be considered for R21 awards. Applications submitted under this mechanism should be exploratory and novel. These studies should break new ground or extend previous discoveries toward new directions or applications. Projects of limited cost or scope that use widely accepted approaches and methods within well established fields are better suited for the R03 small grant mechanism.

Methodology and Measurement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (R03)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $100,000 over two years in four modules of $25,000 each
Due Dates: * February 16 / June 16 / October 16 *letter of intent due thirty days prior to application due date
Expiration Date: September 8, 2011

Description:
The behavioral and social sciences offer significant, fundamental insights into the comprehensive understanding of human health, including disease etiology and treatment, and the promotion of health and well-being. To encourage the investigation of the impact of social and behavioral factors on health and disease, the participating Institutes and Centers (ICs) invite qualified researchers to submit research grant applications on methodology and measurement in the behavioral and social sciences. Methodology and measurement encompass research design, data collection techniques, measurement, and data analysis techniques. The goal of this program announcement is to encourage research that will improve the quality and scientific power of data collected in the behavioral and social sciences, using humans or animals, relevant to the missions of the NIH ICs. Research that addresses methodology and measurement issues in diverse populations, issues in studying sensitive behaviors, issues of ethics in research, issues related to confidential data and the protection of research subjects, and issues in developing interdisciplinary, multimethod, and multilevel approaches to behavioral and social science research is particularly encouraged, as are approaches that integrate behavioral and social science research with biomedical, physical, or computational science research or engineering. Because the focus of this program announcement is developing methodology, rather than addressing a single, health-related research question, applicants are encouraged to propose approaches that would be broadly applicable to basic or applied behavioral and social sciences research related to health.

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages applications addressing four general areas of methodology and measurement research in the social and behavioral sciences, including research design, data collection techniques, measurement, and data analysis. Within the broad spectrum of research defined by these areas, applicants are particularly encouraged (but are not required) to consider studies that address one or more of the following key issues:
 • Methodology and measurement issues in developing innovative interdisciplinary, multimethod, and multilevel research designs for use in behavioral and social science research, with special emphasis on both developing new technologies and addressing the analytical complexities associated with the integration of behavioral, social, and biological data.
 • Methodology and measurement issues in research relating to diverse populations, for example, populations that are distinctive by virtue of age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, culture, including culture-specific medical systems, socio-economic status, literacy, language, or disability.
 • Methodology and measurement issues in studying how dramatic changes in economic, social, environmental, physical, or political context affect human health and well-being, including developing new methods if older ones are no longer valid in the face of significant changes in populations and societies over the last several decades.
 • Methodology and measurement issues in studying potentially sensitive behaviors, such as sexual behavior and abortion, and covert or illegal behaviors such as drug use, abuse, and violence.
 • Methodology and measurement issues that facilitate incorporating measures of social environment with genetic data or enhance bringing genetic measures into studies of social epidemiology.
 • Methodology and measurement issues concerning ethics in research, with emphasis on the topics of informed consent, assessment of risk and benefit, and selection and retention of subjects, and ensuring subjects' confidentiality.

Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches are strongly encouraged. Potential applicants are urged to explore the ideas and methods developed in social science and behavioral fields other than their own and to consider the development and integration of behavioral and social science measures with those of the biomedical, physical, or computational sciences or engineering. Consulting relevant literature and collaborating with colleagues from other disciplines may provide important opportunities for cross-fertilization in developing improved methodology and measurement.

The R03 grant mechanism supports different types of projects including pilot and feasibility studies; secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; development of research methodology; and development of new research technology. The R03 is intended to support small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources.

Reducing Risk Behaviors by Promoting Positive Youth Development (R01)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: varies
Due Dates: February 5 / June 5 / October 5
Expiration Date: September 8, 2011

Description:
The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement is to encourage Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/ organizations that propose to enhance our understanding of effective positive youth development programs and the mechanisms responsible for positive health and developmental outcomes. This will be accomplished through the development, implementation, and evaluation of new or improved positive youth development programs, the evaluation of existing "successful" programs, or the evaluation of effective, evidence-based, gender-inclusive programs that are adapted, translated, or disseminated for new populations of youth and adolescents.

This FOA is designed to stimulate a theoretically grounded program of research to promote the development, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of effective, positive youth development programs for youth from childhood to young adulthood. A multilevel approach will be taken which includes the promotion of positive youth development, the reduction of risk behaviors, and consideration of family, community, social, and political context. The intention of this FOA is to fund high quality, behavioral and social science research with health and behavioral outcomes that will advance the field of positive youth development. Descriptive and intervention research may be proposed.

Research objectives of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) include: 1) understanding elements of effective youth development programs, including the identification and utilization of personal and social assets; 2) the development, implementation, and evaluation of new or improved positive youth development programs; 3) the evaluation of existing “successful” programs that lack rigorous scientific evaluation; or 4) the evaluation of effective, evidence-based, gender-inclusive programs that are adapted, translated, or disseminated for new populations of youth and adolescents (e.g., cultural groups, high risk populations, disenfranchised individuals, or individuals with disabilities or chronic diseases for whom the programs were not originally designed).

Programmatic Issues of Research Interest
This FOA encourages research studies of the development, implementation, and evaluation of theory-based, positive youth development programs. These programs support the acquisition of personal and social assets through activities that promote adolescent well-being and the future successful transition to adulthood. Examples of the types of research and experimental approaches considered appropriate this FOA include, but are not limited to, the following (for more examples, see the program announcement website):
 • Designing, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive or specialized positive youth development programs for health and behavioral outcomes in youth. Does the program reliably demonstrate meaningful effects on the target population in multiple domains (reduction in risk behaviors, increase in resiliency, social capital, individual skills or knowledge)? Have mediators and moderators been contemplated? Does the program fit into the organization's mission and strategy for growth and youth development? Have factors that could negatively impact program delivery or program effectiveness been identified and considered a priori?
 • Using multidisciplinary approaches to understand the biological, social, cognitive and behavioral aspects of positive youth development.
 • Considering the diversity of positive youth development programs available and matching the positive youth development program with the developmental stages of youth, the cultural groups being served, and the community needs and assets. Is there adequate input and feedback from youth, parents, and community members regarding perceived satisfaction and objective measures of program effectiveness?
 • Analyzing appropriate delivery systems for youth development programs and determining which aspects are responsible for behavior change (e.g. motivating youth participation, community involvement, reduction in risk behavior, acquisition of skills).

Appropriate Programs and Projects
Examples of the types of programs and projects considered appropriate to this FOA include, but are not limited to, the following (for more examples, see the program announcement website):
 • Programs that promote academic, moral, spiritual, civic, physical, social and cultural development; that identify individual-level, programmatic, and contextual assets or components critical for effective positive youth development, patterns of assets linked to particular types of successful young adult transitions in various cultural contexts; or that study the neural underpinnings by which contextual factors influence the development of self-regulation and youth behavior; and/or are effective with homogeneous, heterogeneous, or special needs populations (e.g. physical or emotional conditions or disenfranchised youth); are efficient at identifying attitudes and competencies that optimize healthy developmental trajectories; and/or that can be implemented in multiple contexts and simultaneously include risk and promotive factors.
 • Programs that engage parents in the creation of healthier schools and community programs; develop age-appropriate school curricula that improve decision-making skills and self-regulation, increase knowledge, and encourage youth to remain in school; increase attachment to schools, adults, and peers who support healthy norms of behavior; offer challenging opportunities for prosocial activities including community service which can help reduce risk behaviors.
 • Programs delivered as in-school or after-school programs or community-based, and include an array of school-based extracurricular activities including sports, music, art, community service, and others that promote positive youth development.

Reducing Risk Behaviors by Promoting Positive Youth Development (R03)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: varies
Due Dates: February 16 / June 16 / October 16
Expiration Date: September 8, 2011

Description:
This purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement is to encourage Research Project Small (R03) Grant applications from institutions/ organizations that propose to enhance our understanding of effective positive youth development programs and the mechanisms responsible for positive health and developmental outcomes. These studies may include the evaluation of particular components of new or existing youth development programs thought to be responsible for positive development; the examination of child and adolescent assets, behaviors, and development that influence positive youth trajectories; and the evaluation of family, community, or social assets and liabilities that contribute to or hamper youth development. Investigators and/or colleagues should have a strong knowledge of child development.

The R03 grant mechanism supports a variety of projects including pilot and feasibility studies; secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; development of research methodology; and development of new research technology. The R03 small grant mechanism is intended to support small scale research projects that can be carried out in two years or less with limited resources.

This FOA is designed to stimulate a theoretically-grounded program of research by inviting studies that will enhance our understanding of youth development programs that effectively promote positive development and simultaneously reduce risk behaviors. Strong consideration should be given to the following: child and adolescent development; program development, implementation, and evaluation; and contextual influences on the developmental trajectories of youth.

Programmatic Issues of Research Interest
The small grant mechanism (R03) may be used for small self-contained projects, for testing new methodologies and technologies, for obtaining pilot data, or for performing secondary data analysis. The R03 mechanism could be used to study aspects of the types of research listed below. Examples of the types of research and experimental approaches considered appropriate to this FOA include, but are not limited to, the following studies that (for more examples, see the program announcement website):
 • Identify elements of new or existing positive youth development programs that reliably demonstrate meaningful effects on the target population. These elements may include location, mission, leadership, services provided, duration, intensity, cost, availability, transportation, cultural relevance, and interest (motivation). Show how they influence attendance and effectiveness.
 • Examine biological, social, cognitive and/or behavioral aspects of youth development that can be influenced positively by youth development programs.
 • Analyze appropriate delivery systems for youth development programs and determine which aspects are responsible for behavior change (e.g. motivating youth participation, community involvement, reduction in risk behavior, acquisition of skills).

Appropriate Programs and Projects
Examples of the types of programs and projects considered appropriate to this FOA include, but are not limited to, the following (for more examples, see the program announcement website):
 • Programs that promote academic, moral, spiritual, civic, physical, social and cultural development; that identify individual-level, programmatic, and contextual assets or components critical for effective positive youth development, patterns of assets linked to particular types of successful young adult transitions in various cultural contexts; or that study the neural underpinnings by which contextual factors influence the development of self-regulation and youth behavior; and/or are effective with homogeneous, heterogeneous, or special needs populations (e.g. physical or emotional conditions or disenfranchised youth); are efficient at identifying attitudes and competencies that optimize healthy developmental trajectories; and/or that can be implemented in multiple contexts and simultaneously include risk and promotive factors.
 • Programs that engage parents in the creation of healthier schools and community programs; develop age-appropriate school curricula that improve decision-making skills and self-regulation, increase knowledge, and encourage youth to remain in school; increase attachment to schools, adults, and peers who support healthy norms of behavior; offer challenging opportunities for prosocial activities including community service which can help reduce risk behaviors.
 • Programs delivered as in-school or after-school programs or community-based, and include an array of school-based extracurricular activities including sports, music, art, community service, and others that promote positive youth development.

International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development Award (R25)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $230,000 per year for up to five years for a new application for a comprehensive masters level curriculum development and educational programs
Due Date: May 10
*letter of intent due April 10
Expiration/Closing Date: May 11, 2012

Description:
Few developing country institutions provide formal education in research ethics, and few developed country programs for master's level research ethics education/training focus in depth on the aspects of research ethics relevant to international resource poor settings. Therefore, few developing country scientists and health professionals conducting clinical or public health research have received extensive education and training in the principles of research ethics, international codes and legal aspects of ethical research, informed consent, elements of study design that affect the ethical conduct of research and the ethical framework for provision of care and risk/benefit analysis for study participants. Applicants are encouraged to collaborate with the following NIH ICs: NIAID (http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/); (NIMH) (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml); (NHGRI) (http://www.genome.gov/); (NICHD) (http://www.nichd.nih.gov/) and NIBIB (http://www.nibib.nih.gov/) that are participating on this FOA regarding their programs supporting research in developing countries. FIC and the above participating ICs invite applications for International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development Program Award programs:
 • To develop a comprehensive research ethics training program including masters level curricula and practicum opportunities for developing country academics, researchers and health professionals in international ethics related to performing research involving human subjects in international resource poor settings or;
 • To revise and renew existing masters level comprehensive research ethics training programs
 • Alternatively, for developing country applicants only, to submit proposals to support program planning activities in preparation to apply for a comprehensive master's level program support in the future.

The goal of this initiative is to increase the number of developing country scientists, health professionals and relevant academics with in-depth knowledge of the ethical considerations, concepts and applications in clinical and public health research. It is expected that such master's level training will enhance the career development of individuals from developing countries, as well as strengthen and sustain the capacity to support ethical clinical and public health research at their home institutions and countries.

Proposed masters degree or non-degree masters level comprehensive international research ethics education programs should equip academics, health professionals and researchers from developing countries with the critical skills that are needed to subsequently provide research ethics education, ethical review leadership and expert consultation to their institutions, national governments and international bodies and pursue research on ethical practice in clinical and public health research in developing countries.

Proposed comprehensive programs should contain a balance of master's level didactic and practicum research ethics training experiences innovatively designed to build appropriate and sustainable research ethics capacity at developing country institutions. Proposed curricula should provide a core set of masters level study courses that primarily focus on the internationally relevant aspects of ethical, legal and moral principles guiding the responsible conduct of research. Proposed masters level curriculum may be delivered by interactive distance learning technology, if appropriate and sustainable for the developing country individuals and institutions involved. Educational activities should include practicum experiences, such as participation in ethical review committees, development of research ethics education/training courses for researchers and ethical review committee members at their home institutions, analysis of ethical review guidelines or processes and research on ethical practices in biomedical or behavioral research in the participants' countries.

Education may also be provided in areas such as research design methodology, technical manuscript and grant writing, statistical methods, informatics, and English as a second language, if needed. Five year comprehensive training program applications should propose degree or non-degree master's level programs including international research ethics curriculum and practicum experience for up to two years and no less than 12 months for developing country participants at the grantee, consortium or home country institutions. Support can be provided for training developing country academics such as ethicists or philosophers, researchers and health professionals working at institutions conducting clinical or public health research. In addition:
 • Masters level curriculum developed in new comprehensive programs must be offered to participants after a maximum of one year of the award.
 • Renewal applications should describe how ongoing master's level curriculum will be revised based on evaluation during the previous grant period.
 • Comprehensive programs should include activities to enhance and sustain the research ethics capabilities of previous trainees. Applicants are encouraged to propose innovative approaches for continuing research ethics education and networking for previous trainees as well as support for selected former trainees to initiate research ethics training programs, research ethics pilot research projects or human subjects' protections programs at their home institutions.
 • Planning grant proposals should describe in detail how masters level curriculum components and educational activities will be designed for a comprehensive program during the two-year award period.

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

Granting Institution: National Science Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: varies
Due Date: August 25, 2010, Fourth Wednesday in August Annually Thereafter; REU Site Proposals requiring access to Antarctica due First Friday in June Annually

Description: The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. This solicitation features two mechanisms for support of student research: (1) REU Sites are based on independent proposals to initiate and conduct projects that engage a number of students in research. REU Sites may be based in a single discipline or academic department, or on interdisciplinary or multi-department research opportunities with a coherent intellectual theme. Proposals with an international dimension are welcome. A partnership with the Department of Defense supports REU Sites in DoD-relevant research areas. (2) REU Supplements may be requested for ongoing NSF-funded research projects or may be included as a component of proposals for new or renewal NSF grants or cooperative agreements.

Research experience is one of the most effective avenues for attracting talented undergraduates to, and retaining them in careers in, science and engineering, including careers in teaching and education research. The REU program, through both Sites and Supplements, aims to provide appropriate and valuable educational experiences for undergraduate students through participation in research. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. REU projects feature high-quality interaction of students with faculty and/or other research mentors and access to appropriate facilities and professional development opportunities.

REU Site and Supplement projects may be carried out during the summer months, during the academic year, or both. REU Sites may be proposed for durations of one to five years, with a three-year duration being typical in most NSF directorates. The term of REU Supplements may not exceed that of the underlying research project.

REU Sites
REU Sites are based on independent proposals, submitted for an annual deadline date, to initiate and conduct projects that engage a number of undergraduate students in research. REU Sites must have a well-defined common focus that enables a cohort experience for students. These projects may be based in a single discipline or academic department, or on interdisciplinary or multi-department research opportunities with a coherent intellectual theme. A proposal should reflect the unique combination of the proposing organization's interests and capabilities and those of any partnering organizations. Cooperative arrangements among organizations and research settings will be considered so that a project might increase the quality or availability of undergraduate research experiences. To extend research opportunities to a larger number of undergraduates, proposers might also consider incorporating approaches that make use of cyberinfrastructure or other advanced technologies that facilitate research, learning, and collaboration over distances.

REU Supplements
An REU Supplement typically provides support for one or two undergraduate students to participate in research as part of a new or ongoing NSF-funded research project. However, centers or large research efforts may request support for a number of students commensurate with the size and nature of the project. REU Supplements are supported by the various disciplinary and education research programs throughout the Foundation, including programs such as Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR).

Special Opportunities
Some applicants might be interested in the following opportunities as elements of their REU projects. These are optional; proposals are not required to respond to any of them.

Partnership with the Department of Defense
NSF engages in a partnership with the Department of Defense (DoD) to expand undergraduate research opportunities in DoD-relevant research areas through the REU Sites program. The DoD activity is called Awards to Stimulate and Support Undergraduate Research Experiences (ASSURE; http://www.wpafb.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=9333).

Partnership with the Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program
The U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) intends to expand undergraduate research opportunities in the area of geothermal energy by providing funds to NSF for meritorious REU Site proposals with that focus. The goal of this collaboration between DoE's GTP and NSF's REU program is to introduce more undergraduate students to renewable energy research and the many opportunities in science and engineering related to geothermal energy.

International Projects
The REU program encourages projects with an international dimension. International projects typically involve partnering a U.S. REU project with one or more international collaborators in a specific institution or organization. Successful international REU projects include (1) true intellectual collaboration with a foreign partner and (2) benefits that are realized from the expertise, specialized skills, facilities, phenomena, or other resources that the foreign collaborator or research environment provides.

Ethics in Science or Engineering
The America COMPETES Act (42 U.S.C. 1862o-1) requires institutions to have a plan for training all students supported on an NSF award in the responsible and ethical conduct of research. Over and above this basic requirement, the REU program invites REU Site applicants to apply for up to $4,000 per year of additional funding (direct costs) for carefully designed, clearly articulated activities focusing on ethics in science and engineering. Applying for the ethics-component funding is optional. An applicant who chooses to request it must include in the proposal a detailed description and cost breakdown for the ethics activities. Proposals that include the supplementary focused ethics component are often referred to a program officer in NSF's Ethics and Values in Science, Engineering, and Technology (EVS) program, who reviews the ethics component for possible funding by that program and offers suggestions to improve the ethics activities.

Research Experiences for Teachers
NSF encourages research experiences for K-12 teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and the coordination of these experiences with REU projects.

From Beliefs to Virtuous Behaviors

Granting Institution: John Templeton Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $50,000 - $250,000
Due Date:August 1 – October 15
Full Proposal Submission Window: December 1 – March 15 (Invitation Only)

Description:
A great deal of recent work in psychology, philosophy, and cognitive science argues that human actions are determined primarily by unconscious mental processes. In these accounts, there is little or no role for personal beliefs, deliberative reasoning, or traditional notions of vice and virtue. In Jonathan Haidt's memorable image, the conscious mind is like a young boy riding the elephant of the unconscious. Michael Gazzaniga sees little evidence that moral reasoning correlates with moral behavior. John Bargh and Benjamin Libet argue that unnoticed environmental conditions and unconscious mental processes are the primary drivers of behavior. Gilbert Harman and John Doris insist that virtue and vice are fictions.

But is this the full story? To what extent, and under what circumstances, do conscious processes, especially beliefs, lead to virtuous behaviors? Sir John Templeton was convinced that human beings are capable of consciously shaping their own values and, thereby, their perceptions of the world and their engagement with it. One of his favorite maxims was "When you rule your mind, you rule your world.” More than seventy other "laws" in his book Worldwide Laws of Life (1997) concern the ability of our minds to shape our intentionality. Does this maxim hold up under careful empirical scrutiny? When and how do positive beliefs yield beneficial results for individuals and society?

Our 2010 Funding Priority "From Beliefs to Virtuous Behaviors" aims to support innovative research that links rigorous science to how people can come to act in more beneficial ways. All submissions should respond directly to one or more of the following Big Questions:

 • How and when do beliefs influence the acquisition of virtuous behaviors?
 • What kinds of beliefs tend to promote behavior that benefits both the individual and society?
 • How can people train their minds so that their conscious thoughts and beliefs have a greater influence on their behavior?

Applicants should show how the proposed research would address at least one of the qualities of character emphasized by Sir John Templeton in the Foundation's charter.

Preference will be given to collaborative work involving several disciplines or sub-fields, but this is not a requirement.

Thrift and Thriving

Granting Institution: John Templeton Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $50,000 - $400,000
Due Date: August 1 – October 15
Full Proposal Submission Window: December 1 - March 15 (Invitation Only)

Description: The recent global financial meltdown has highlighted the devastating consequences of indebtedness and overspending at the individual, institutional, and governmental levels. It has also renewed interest in thrift as an essential component of both personal and public financial stewardship. Though often dismissed as mere frugality or penny-pinching, thrift is a classical American virtue, rooted in a profound understanding of the enduring worth of work, savings, and prosperity. Restoring a culture of thrift, based on principle not just on necessity, has become an urgent need for the success of individuals and even the survival of nations.

The Foundation wishes to encourage a greater understanding of the moral and spiritual dimensions of thrift; to support new, culturally astute approaches to teaching the habits and philosophy of thrift; and to shift public discourse so that thrift can be viewed as a key factor in producing the resiliency necessary for human thriving and institutional and social health. Proposals for achieving these ends might include such things as curricula to teach thrift and financial stewardship at the high school level; research on the social, psychological, and economic factors that foster thrift or undermine it; or media projects aimed at educating and encouraging the practice of thrift.

The Foundation's 2010 Funding Priority on "Thrift and Thriving" aims to generate new research and innovative programming. Applicants are asked to respond directly to one or more of the following Big Questions:

 • What is the relationship of self-control and future-mindedness to the practice of thrift and the avoidance of imprudent investments?
 • Can a renewed cultural emphasis on the connection between thrift and thriving contribute to a recovery of the “American Dream”?
 • What kinds of interventions and programs can be developed that will inspire and empower individuals and institutions to be thrifty?

Getty Images Grants for Good

Granting Institution: Getty Images
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $15,000 (divided between photographer and communications agency)
Due Date:March 1

Description:
We proudly support photographers and communications professionals who use imagery to promote positive change in our world. To that end, we've launched our Grants for Good.

Nonprofits need imagery to tell their stories effectively, which is why our Grants for Good provide two grants of $15,000 annually, to cover photographer, filmmaker and agency costs as they create compelling new imagery for the nonprofit of their choice.

Grants recipients may use the entire award to offset shoot expenses, or choose to donate all or part of it directly to their charity and contribute their own time and resources. The photographer and the nonprofit as well as the communications agency involved will be showcased to the media and to our customers.

The intent of this grant is to provide funding for a photographer or filmmaker and marketing or advertising communications professionals to collaborate in developing imagery which furthers the strategic communication objectives and mission of a nonprofit organization.

Application Submission Guidelines: Download PDF

FAQ: Download PDF

Fellowships @ the Woodrow Wilson Center Granting Institution: Woodrow Wilson International

Granting Institution: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Nine Month Appointment, Stipend up to $85,000
Due Date: October 1

Description: The Center awards approximately 20-25 residential fellowships annually to individuals with outstanding project proposals in a broad range of the social sciences and humanities on national and/or international issues. Topics and scholarship should relate to key public policy challenges or provide the historical and/or cultural framework to illuminate policy issues of contemporary importance.

Themes
The Center devotes significant attention to the exploration of broad thematic areas.

Primary themes are:

  1. governance, including such issues as the key features of the development of democratic institutions, democratic society, civil society, and citizen participation;   2. the U.S. role in the world and issues of partnership and leadership—military, political, and economic dimensions; and   3. key long-term future challenges confronting the United States and the world.

While the Center does not engage in formulating actual policy, priority will be given to proposals related to these themes and intersecting with crucial public policy issues. Within this framework, the Center also welcomes projects that provide the historical and/or cultural context for some of today's significant public policy debates.

Fellows' Responsibilities
The Center's "scholars in residence" are so in both name and fact. Fellows are expected to work from their offices at the Center and to participate in appropriate meetings organized by the Center. Fellows are also expected to present their research at our informal internal Work-in-Progress seminars, and to attend the Work-in-Progress presentations given by their colleagues. In addition, fellows are encouraged to make a more formal presentation to the public such as a colloquium, seminar, workshop, or other form of meeting. The Center expects all fellows to seek ways to share their expertise with the Washington policy community. The form of such interaction could range from a deep background briefing for an executive branch agency to an informal roundtable discussion with members of Congress and their staffs.

Abe Fellowship: International Multidisciplinary Research on Topics of Pressing Global Concern

Granting Institution: Social Science Research Council (SSRC); Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP); American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Three to twelve months of full-time support over a twenty-four month period
Due Date: September 1

Description:
The Abe Fellowship is designed to encourage international multidisciplinary research on topics of pressing global concern. The program seeks to foster the development of a new generation of researchers who are interested in policy-relevant topics of long-range importance and who are willing to become key members of a bilateral and global research network built around such topics. It strives especially to promote a new level of intellectual cooperation between the Japanese and American academic and professional communities committed to and trained for advancing global understanding and problem solving.

Research support to individuals is at the core of the Abe Fellowship Program. Applications are welcome from scholars and non-academic research professionals. The objectives of the program are to foster high quality research in the social sciences and related disciplines, to build new collaborative networks of researchers around the three thematic foci of the program, to bring new data and new data resources to the attention of those researchers, and to obtain from them a commitment to a comparative or transnational line of inquiry.

Successful applicants will be those individuals whose work and interests match these program goals. Abe Fellows are expected to demonstrate a long-term commitment to these goals by participating in program activities over the course of their careers.

The Abe Fellowship Research Agenda
Applicants are invited to submit proposals for research in the social sciences and related disciplines relevant to any one or any combination of the three themes below. Research proposals bearing on these themes may address issues related to human security, multilateralism, bilateralism, U.S.-Japan relations, transnational economic relations, the empowerment of peoples and communities, and sustainable development, among others. The themes are:

 • Traditional and non-traditional approaches to security and diplomacy: Appropriate research topics include transnational terrorism, internal ethnic and religious strife, infectious diseases, food safety, climate change, and non-proliferation, as well as the role of cultural initiatives in peace building.
 • Global and regional economic issues: Suitable topics include regional and bilateral trade arrangements, globalization and the mitigation of its adverse consequences, sustainable urbanization, and environmental degradation.
 • The role of civil society: Appropriate issues include demographic change, immigration, the role of NPOs and NGOs as champions of the public interest, social enterprise, and corporate social responsibility.

Across the Program's three dominant themes, priority is given to projects that demonstrate important contributions to intellectual and/or policy debates and break new theoretical or empirical ground. Applicants are expected to show how the proposed project goes beyond previous work on the topic and builds on prior skills to move into new intellectual terrain.

Policy-Relevant, Contemporary, and Comparative or Transnational Research
Rather than seeking to promote greater understanding of a single country - Japan or the United States - the Abe Fellowship Program encourages research a comparative or global perspective. The program promotes deeply contextualized cross-cultural research.

The Abe Fellowship Program Committee seeks applications for research explicitly focused on policy-relevant and contemporary issues with a comparative or transnational perspective that draw the study of the United States and Japan into wider disciplinary or theoretical debates.

POLICY RELEVANCE
The Program defines policy-relevant research as the study of existing public policies for the purpose of: a) deepening understanding of those policies and their consequences; and b) formulating more effective policies. Policy-relevance can also be found in research questions that are pertinent to understanding public dialogue on contemporary issues of concern to various sectors of society. All proposals are expected to directly address policy-relevance in theme, project description and project structure.

CONTEMPORARY FOCUS
The Program is concerned with present day issues and debates. Thus, proposals in history or with a historical component must demonstrate how the research is specifically intended to inform contemporary concerns.

COMPARATIVE OR TRANSNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES
The Abe Fellowship Program does not support research on a single country. Priority is accorded to comparisons of processes, problems and issues across time and space. Successful proposals will explicitly address how the project will be comparative or transnational in construction and goals.

Social Initiatives Foundation Grants

Granting Institution: Social Initiatives Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Normally from $10,000 to $20,000
Concept Application Deadline: August 15, 2010
Proposal Deadline: November 15, 2010 (by invitation only)

Description:
The Sociological Initiatives Foundation was established to support research that furthers social change, including language learning and behavior and its intersection with social and policy questions.

 • The Foundation specifically supports research that focuses on:
 • Social policy objectives
 • Institutional and educational practices
 • Legislative and regulatory changes
 • Linguistic issues (e.g. literacy, language loss and maintenance, language policy, language and national security, bilingualism, language and gender, language and law, language disabilities, language and health, language and education, different language cultures).
 • Development of community capacity and organization of previously unorganized groups

The Foundation supports projects that address institutional rather than individual or behavioral change. It seeks to fund research and initiatives that provide insight into sociological and linguistic issues that may be useful to specific groups and or communities.

We look for projects that have an explicit research design and a concrete connection to public or community impact. It is not enough to just write a report or add a focus group to a social change project. The research should ideally build an organization or constituency's potential to expand public knowledge, impact policy, and create social change.

Some examples of desired applicants are:


 • academic-community partnerships
 • advocacy or community groups that conduct research that can withstand challenge in academic and policy arenas
 • academics that organize or link to a constituency through their research

Sundance Documentary Fund

Granting Institution: Sundance Institute
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award:  
Due Date:  

Description:
The Sundance Documentary Fund is a key program of the Documentary Film Program, dedicated to supporting U.S. and international documentary films that focus on current human rights issues, freedom of expression, social justice, civil liberties, and exploring critical issues of our time. The Documentary Fund was established at Sundance Institute in 2002 with a gift from the Open Society Institute and is supported by a leadership grant from the Ford Foundation.

Documentary Fund grants are announced 2-3 times a year and between 2002-2006, the Fund has disbursed almost $5.2 million to over 175 projects in 52 countries. In supporting such work, the Sundance Documentary Fund encourages the diverse exchange of ideas crucial to developing an open society, raising public consciousness about human rights abuses and restrictions of civil liberties, and fostering an ongoing dialogue about these issues.

The Documentary Fund now considers projects in four categories—Development, Production and Post-Production, Engagement* and Impact.*

Development grants provide seed funds to filmmakers whose projects are in the early research or pre-production stage. Grant award is up to $20,000. A previous directing sample is required. (If no directing sample is available, a creative visual work indicating the director's artistic point of view and storytelling ability is required).

Production and Post-Production grants provide funds to filmmakers in various stages of the production and post-production stages. Applications should include at least 20 continuously edited material. Longer cuts and fine cuts can be submitted if available. If you are early in production and have a trailer or selected scenes that are shorter in length than 20 minutes, please contact DFP staff to determine whether your material is sufficient to submit a formal application.

*Engagement grants are awarded to innovative distribution and audience engagement strategies. Available to previous grantees only.

*Impact grants support on-going work on the issues by the filmmakers. By invitation only.

The Borchard Foundation Center on Law and Aging Academic Research Grant Program

Granting Institution: The Borchard Foundation Center on Law and Aging
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Up to $20,000
Deadline: October 15, 2010

Description:
The Borchard Foundation Center on Law & Aging underwrites an Academic Research Grant Program to further scholarship about new or improved public policies, laws and/or programs that will enhance the quality of life for the elderly. Each grant recipient is required to publish an article on the subject of their research in a top flight journal.

What Are the Objectives of the Grants?
The Center recognizes the need for further research and scholarship about new or improved public policies, laws and/or programs that will enhance the quality of life for the elderly (including those who are poor or otherwise isolated by lack of education, language, culture, disability, or other barriers).

What Kinds of Projects Will be Funded?
The Center expects grantees to meet the objectives of the grant program through individual or collaborative research projects that:

• Analyze and recommend changes in one or more important existing public policies, laws, and/or programs relating to the elderly; or

• Anticipate the need for and recommend new public policies, laws, and/or programs for the elderly necessitated by changes in the number and demographics of the country's and the world's elderly populations, by advances in science and technology, by changes in the health care system, or by other developments.


Scholars in the fields of health, law, medicine and sociology have been awarded grants.

Current and Past Recipients: http://www.borchardcenter.org/academic-research-grant- program/current-and-past-recipients

Templeton Research Grants in Evil, Pain, and the Nature of Mind

Granting Institution: University of Notre Dame Center for the Philosophy of Religion; The John Templeton Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Up to $300,000 (Although projects over $70,000 will require special justification.)
Deadline: November 15, 2010

Description:
The Templeton Research Grants in Evil, Pain, and the Nature of Mind funds research devoted to inquiry into the problem of evil as it bears on non-human animal pain and suffering. Since the publication of the Origin of Species, scholars from a variety of the religious and theological perspectives, have puzzled over how God could permit the magnitude and duration of pain and suffering that is found in the non-human animal world, especially as it is manifested in the winnowing process of natural selection—a process that seems instrumental to the flowering of organismic complexity and diversity. As David Hull has poignantly asked:

What kind of God can one infer from the sort of phenomena epitomized by the species on Darwin's Galápagos Islands? The evolutionary process is rife with happenstance, contingency, incredible waste, death, pain and horror… Whatever the God implied by evolutionary theory and the data of natural history may be like, He is not the Protestant God of waste not, want not. He is also not a loving God who cares about His productions…The God of the Galápagos is careless, wasteful, indifferent, almost diabolical. He is certainly not the sort of God to whom anyone would be inclined to pray. ("The God of the Galápagos." 1991. Nature 352:485f.)

Understanding the theological and philosophical implications of non-human animal pain requires a careful and subtle understanding both of the nature of non-human animal sentience/ consciousness, and of theodicy. As a result, research on this topic draws distinctively on a variety of fields in philosophy, theology, and the natural sciences. Scholars from across these disciplines are thus invited to apply for grants to engage in research aimed at addressing this issue. The three major components of the Templeton Research Program are:

• Performing cutting edge research on non-human animals pain, the nature of mind, and the relevance of such pain to the problem of evil.

• Researching the extent to which an enhanced understanding of pain and nature of mind extends and/or informs our conceptions of the nature and reality of God and evil.

• Utilizing the rich resources that are available at the University of Notre Dame and the Center for Philosophy of Religion.

Scholars in the fields of health, law, medicine and sociology have been awarded grants.

After completion of the program, each research team is expected to complete and disseminate the results of their research through publications, lectures, or presentations at academic conferences within a short time after the end of the program.

Sample Research Grant Projects: http://www.nd.edu/~cprelig/poe/research_sample.html

Templeton Research Fellowships in Evil and Skeptical Theism

Granting Institution: University of Notre Dame Center for the Philosophy of Religion; The John Templeton Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $55,000 to $85,000 stipend
Deadline: January 15, 2011

Description:
The University of Notre Dame, the Center for the Philosophy of Religion and The John Templeton Foundation, are pleased to announce the "Templeton Research Fellowships in Evil and Skeptical Theism" program for 2011-2012. The Problem of Evil in Modern and Contemporary Thought project invites recent Ph.D.'s and seasoned experts in philosophy of religion or theology to apply for a year-long residential fellowship. The fellowship allows scholars to pursue independent research in residence as a fellow of the Center for Philosophy of Religion at the University of Notre Dame. We will award at least two fellowships, open rank.

The Templeton Research Fellowships in Evil and Skeptical Theism offer at least two fellowships devoted to inquiry into skeptical theism as it bears on the problem of evil. Many philosophers are inclined to address the problem of evil by endorsing a kind of skepticism about our ability to determine whether particular evils might possibly serve greater goods that a loving God might hope to promote by permitting them. Accordingly, such philosophers argue that the fact that many evils seem pointless to us is no evidence that they are pointless, and hence no evidence against the existence of a perfectly loving God who would prevent pointless evils. This strategy for replying to the problem of evil is known as 'skeptical theism', and it has been both developed and criticized with increasing sophistication in the recent literature on the problem of evil. Fellows will examine the plausibility of skeptical theism as well as the way skeptical theism can or does illuminate the extent and limits of human knowledge about divine reality and about the nature and reality of God and evil.

The three major components of the Templeton Research Fellows in Evil and Skeptical Theism Program are:

• Performing cutting edge research on skeptical theism and its relevance to the problem of evil.

• Researching the extent to which skeptical theism is plausible, and/or informs our conceptions of the nature and reality of God and evil.

• Utilizing the rich resources that are available at the University of Notre Dame and the Center for Philosophy of Religion.

Each Fellow is expected to complete and disseminate the results of their research through publications, lectures, or presentations at academic conferences within a short time after the end of the fellowship program.

Sample Projects: http://www.nd.edu/~cprelig/poe/fellowships_st_sample.html

Can GM Crops Help to Feed the World?

Granting Institution: The John Templeton Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: varies
Deadline: February 1, 2011 – April 15, 2011

Description:
The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations estimates that chronic hunger and malnutrition currently plagues 820 million people, over one-eighth of today's world population of 6.8 billion. By 2050, the world population is expected to reach 9 billion. To accommodate this growth, the FAO warns that the world will have to nearly double its current output of food, feed, and fiber. Without new technology and innovative farming methods, this goal will be very hard to meet. Most of the world's poor and hungry live in the rural areas of less developed countries, where small-scale agriculture constitutes the main economic activity.

The Foundation's Funding Priority on genetically modified (GM) crops is part of our broader, charter-based mandate to fund highly focused, highly strategic initiatives on genetics. In early 2011, we will accept Online Funding Inquiries for research proposals that focus on improved understanding of the potential benefits and applications of GM crops.

Most parts of the world now generally accept the use of genetic engineering in medicine and industrial microbiology ("red" and "white" biotechnology). But a variety of political and perception issues have led to restrictions on the production and use of GM crop plants ("green" biotechnology). As a result, although primary scientific research in this area is well funded by government, industry, and the philanthropic sector, investigation of the optimal practices and policies for applying this primary research has received much less attention and support.

Possible lines of further inquiry may include research on:

• whether and how region-appropriate GM crops can reduce poverty and improve nutrition among the most disadvantaged;

• the social, economic, and environmental benefits and risks of GM crops, with special reference to the needs of small landholders;

• the barriers that prevent the acceptance and use of GM crops, including the analysis of enabling and disabling policies;

• the financing and/or informational mechanisms needed by small-scale farmers to give them access to GM crops; whether and how the widespread adoption of GM crops can reduce environmental degradation and wastage while recognizing agricultural realities (like proneness to drought) in different regions;

• the roles of international trade, biosecurity, and regulatory and/or intellectual property frameworks in facilitating the adoption of GM crops;

• financial and other support for researchers on GM crops who are returning to less developed countries after training elsewhere;

• collaboration among researchers on GM crops in less developed countries, including, possibly, the creation of regional groupings

A specific example of a research topic that might be of interest to the Foundation is the use of communications technologies, such as satellite transmission and cell phones, to help small farmers sustain food production locally, connect to local weather and market information, and think of market opportunities beyond sustenance agriculture. Can these technologies be used for GM crops, leading to increased levels of awareness and knowledge, entrepreneurship and household income among disadvantaged farmers? How can public health, food security, and the commodity chain be sustained and significantly enhanced in facing the challenge of a rising global population?

The Foundation is continuing to refine this Funding Priority. For the time being, we offer the following Big Questions as likely candidates for what applicants will be asked to address when they file Online Funding Inquiries starting in early 2011. Please check back in the coming months for further details.

1. Can GM crops significantly reduce poverty and confer health benefits on the least well- off in less developed countries?

2. What are the nutritional, social, and environmental consequences of GM crops? In which regions of the world would their use be most appropriate and beneficial? In which settings might they worsen the situation?

3. Can the use of GM crops have an economic impact across different levels of income in less developed countries? What role might they play in improved land use (e.g., less chemical fertilizer); more efficient production, with possible reductions in energy expenditures; the enhancement of domestic and international marketing services; and improved credit facilities?

4. What sort of legal framework can be created for commodity chains based on global developments in the production and use of GM crops?

The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Research Grants

Granting Institution: The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $15,000 to $30,000 per year for one or two years
Deadline: August 1

Description:
The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation (HFG) welcomes proposals from any of the natural and social sciences and the humanities that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence, aggression, and dominance. Highest priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence, aggression, and dominance in the modern world.

Particular questions that interest HFG concern violence, aggression, and dominance in relation to social change, the socialization of children, intergroup conflict, interstate warfare, crime, family relationships, and investigations of the control of aggression and violence. Research with no useful relevance to understanding human problems will not be supported, nor will proposals to investigate urgent social problems where the foundation cannot be assured that useful, sound research can be done. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources.

Violence is widely recognized as a problem in modern society. Americans identify violent crime as a predominant concern, and violent behavior is increasing among our young people. Here and abroad hostility and competition among ethnic groups have taken on a new prominence, and reports of wars from Russia to Rwanda describe a new world order as volatile as ever before, buffeted by animosities that are part of history as well as by violent responses to contemporary inequities. In too many cases, the tools of conflict resolution, therapy, and diplomacy are not working, but the urgency of each situation seems to demand immediate responses, even responses which experience and good judgment tell us will not be effective. Tough crime bills are passed, more prisons are built, high school classes are devoted to role- playing conflict situations, orphanages are proposed. The United Nations sends peacekeepers into impossible situations where its legitimacy is challenged by all sides. The results of these interventions are unpredictable, and at those rare times when peace breaks out, no one is sure why it happened.

Harry Guggenheim established this foundation to support research on violence, aggression, and dominance because he was convinced that solid, thoughtful, scholarly and scientific research, experimentation, and analysis would in the end accomplish more than the usual solutions impelled by urgency rather than understanding. We do not yet hold the solution to violence, but better analyses, more acute predictions, constructive criticisms, and new, effective ideas will come in time from investigations such as those supported by our grants.

The foundation places a priority on the study of urgent problems of violence and aggression in the modern world and also encourages related research projects in neuroscience, genetics, animal behavior, the social sciences, history, criminology, and the humanities which illuminate modern human problems. Grants have been made to study aspects of violence related to youth, family relationships, media effects, crime, biological factors, intergroup conflict related to religion, ethnicity, and nationalism, and political violence deployed in war and sub-state terrorism, as well as processes of peace and the control of aggression.

Research Priorities: http://www.hfg.org/rp/introduction.htm

Past Grants: http://www.hfg.org/rg/past.htm

New Frontiers in the Psychology of Character

Granting Institution: Wake Forest University & John Templeton Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $50,000 to $200,000 for projects not to exceed two years in duration
Deadline: Letters of intent due by November 29 2010; full proposals (by invite) due March 28, 2011.

Description:
Wake Forest University, with the help of a very generous grant from The John Templeton Foundation, welcomes proposals for the "New Frontiers in the Psychology of Character" funding initiative. We aim to support young scholars working on the psychology of character, who often have new and interesting ideas but who have not yet benefitted from traditional funding sources. Thus, we would give preference to proposals from PIs who are within ten years of receiving their Ph.D. We envision applicants from personality, social, and developmental psychology in particular, but possibly other subfields as well, who are interested in the ability of people to achieve moral behavior. Interdisciplinary teams of psychologists working with faculty in other disciplines, especially philosophy or theology, are encouraged (but team-based proposals are not required).

Twelve Key Questions:

1. Are there reliable and meaningful individual differences in dispositions to think, feel, and act in morally relevant ways?

2. Is there evidence, including consistency evidence, for the existence of character traits?

3. If character traits do stand up to empirical scrutiny, are they best conceptualized as general traits, such as those in the Big Five approach (openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism), or are they better understood as hundreds of highly localized traits? If they are general traits, does the Big Five approach capture all of them?

4. What are the empirically most promising psychological models of character traits, including integrating both character traits and situations in the explanation and prediction of behavior?

5. What roles do beliefs, desires, and emotions play in character traits?

6. Do goals and identities have important relationships to character?

7. How much self-regulation do people have over their character traits at a given moment and over a given period of time?

8. What is the best way to define situations in the first place in order to empirically assess the role of situations in influencing character-relevant behavior?

9. How does character develop and/or how it is perceived?

10. How accurate is the understanding people typically have of their own character traits?
And how accurate is the understanding people have of other people‟s character traits?

11. How do people acquire character traits over time? Are certain strategies more effective in cultivating a given character trait than others?

12. What new (or old) methods and analytic techniques can best be utilized to reach breakthroughs in the study of character?

Character and Virtue
Psychologists have defined "character" in many ways, with no universal agreement as to its meaning. The broadest definitions have "character" as nearly synonymous with "personality". Some of these broad definitions exclude intelligence and abilities from the notion of personality, in order to focus on the characteristics of the person. Mid-breadth definitions limit "character" to "virtue", meaning the virtuous or strength aspects of personality (along with their attendant vices). These definitions refer to personality characteristics such as courage, compassion, honesty, and self-control, among others. The most specific and central definitions emphasize ethical and moral behavior, defining character as the collection of dispositions to think, feel, and act in morally relevant ways, and especially individual differences in those dispositions. This last definition brings the complete package of character, morality, ethics, and virtue back to psychology.

We will give preference to projects the closer they are to the specific and central definition of character. However, because we believe that the best science is basic, we realize that some projects may be more appropriately studied at the broadest level. Thus, we welcome applications at all levels of breadth of definition. If a project defines character at a broader level, then the project must address questions that have relatively salient implications for character, and these implications must be spelled out in the application.

Soros Justice Advocacy Fellowships

Granting Institution: Open Society Foundations
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Full Guidelines: Guidelines Information
Award: Stipend of $75,000-$100,000 over eighteen months
Deadline: November 3, 2010

Description:
The Soros Justice Advocacy Fellowships fund outstanding individuals—including lawyers, advocates, grassroots organizers, activist academics, and others with unique perspectives—to initiate innovative policy advocacy projects at the local, state, and national levels that will have a measurable impact on one or more of the Open Society Foundations U.S. criminal justice reform priorities. Projects may range from litigation to public education to coalition-building to grassroots mobilization to action research. Advocacy Fellowships are 18 months in duration, may be implemented in conjunction with a host organization, and can begin in either April or September of 2011.

Individuals with projects that propose, as their primary purpose, the completion of books, print or radio journalism, documentary film or video, or other similar media should apply for the Soros Justice Media Fellowships.

All Advocacy Fellowship projects must reflect one or more of the Criminal Justice Fund's priorities (see "Criminal Justice Fund Priorities" below).

The Problem: Mass Incarceration, Harsh Punishment, and Unequal Justice.
The Criminal Justice Fund seeks to promote open society values by reducing the destructive impact of current criminal justice policies on the lives of individuals, families and communities in the United States. In the U.S., 1.6 million people are in prison. Another 723,000 people are in local jails. In a nation of 230 million adults, this means that one in every 99 people is behind bars. The number of adults on probation or parole exceeds five million.

These statistics paint a disturbing picture. This country's over-reliance on incarceration and correctional control is driven by a culture of punishment that includes heavy-handed law enforcement practices, lack of adequate legal assistance, and the criminalization of vulnerable populations. Harsh and excessive sentences, including the death penalty and life without the possibility of parole, are among the drivers of this problem. Well-documented, too, is the fact that the costs of these policies are borne most heavily by individuals and communities already pushed to the margins of American life—residents of low-income communities, racial and ethnic minorities, and individuals suffering from mental illness and drug dependency.

Criminal Justice Fund Priorities.
The Criminal Justice Fund takes aim at these problems by pursuing three broad but interrelated goals: reducing mass incarceration, eliminating harsh punishment, and securing a fair and equitable system of justice. In support of these goals, the Criminal Justice Fund prioritizes efforts to:

• Attack the excessive and economically destructive costs of incarceration

• Eliminate harsh and unjust sentencing practices

• Reform parole and probation policies and practices

• Foster new approaches to drug policy

• Combat the criminalization of marginalized populations, e.g. people with mental illness, homeless individuals, young people, immigrants

• End punitive school disciplinary policies

• Eliminate unreasonable barriers to the reintegration of people returning from prison, as well as challenge the stigmatization of people with criminal records

• Improve indigent defense services and systems

• End the treatment of children as adults in prosecution and sentencing

• Abolish the death penalty

• Reform police and prosecution practices

Soros Media Advocacy Fellowships

Granting Institution: Open Society Foundations
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Full Guidelines: Guidelines Information
Award: Stipend of $75,000-$100,000 over eighteen months
Deadline: November 3, 2010

Description:
The Soros Justice Media Fellowships support writers, print and broadcast journalists, bloggers, filmmakers, and other individuals with distinct voices proposing to complete media projects for local, regional, and national markets that engage the public and spur debate on one or more of the Open Society Foundations' U.S. criminal justice priorities. The fellowships aim to mitigate the time, space, and market constraints that often discourage individuals from pursuing important but marginalized, controversial or unpopular issues in a comprehensive manner. Media fellowships are one year in duration, and fellows are expected to make their projects their full- time work during the term of the fellowship. Projects can begin in either April or September of 2011.

All Media Fellowship projects must reflect one or more of the Criminal Justice Fund's priorities (see "Criminal Justice Fund Priorities" below).

The Problem: Mass Incarceration, Harsh Punishment, and Unequal Justice.
The Criminal Justice Fund seeks to promote open society values by reducing the destructive impact of current criminal justice policies on the lives of individuals, families and communities in the United States. In the U.S., 1.6 million people are in prison. Another 723,000 people are in local jails. In a nation of 230 million adults, this means that one in every 99 people is behind bars. The number of adults on probation or parole exceeds five million.

These statistics paint a disturbing picture. This country's over-reliance on incarceration and correctional control is driven by a culture of punishment that includes heavy-handed law enforcement practices, lack of adequate legal assistance, and the criminalization of vulnerable populations. Harsh and excessive sentences, including the death penalty and life without the possibility of parole, are among the drivers of this problem. Well-documented, too, is the fact that the costs of these policies are borne most heavily by individuals and communities already pushed to the margins of American life—residents of low-income communities, racial and ethnic minorities, and individuals suffering from mental illness and drug dependency.

Criminal Justice Fund Priorities.
The Criminal Justice Fund takes aim at these problems by pursuing three broad but interrelated goals: reducing mass incarceration, eliminating harsh punishment, and securing a fair and equitable system of justice. In support of these goals, the Criminal Justice Fund prioritizes efforts to:

• Attack the excessive and economically destructive costs of incarceration

• Eliminate harsh and unjust sentencing practices

• Reform parole and probation policies and practices

• Foster new approaches to drug policy

• Combat the criminalization of marginalized populations, e.g. people with mental illness, homeless individuals, young people, immigrants

• End punitive school disciplinary policies

• Eliminate unreasonable barriers to the reintegration of people returning from prison, as well as challenge the stigmatization of people with criminal records

• Improve indigent defense services and systems

• End the treatment of children as adults in prosecution and sentencing

• Abolish the death penalty

• Reform police and prosecution practices

Kornfeld Program in Bioethics and Patient Care

Granting Institution: The Greenwall Foundation; The Emily Davie and Joseph S. Kornfeld Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award:
Due Date: February 1, 2011; August 1, 2011

Description:
The Kornfeld Program in Bioethics and Patient Care focuses on ethical issues affecting the lives of patients on an individual level. Priority will be given to projects practical (rather than theoretical) with anticipated outcomes applicable at the patients' bedside. Junior investigators will be encouraged to apply as well as researchers seeking support for pilot projects. It is anticipated four to six grants will be awarded each year and multi-year initiatives will be considered.

Research on Research Integrity (R21)

Granting Institution: National Institutes of Health
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Up to $275,000 over a 2-year project
Due Date: Letter of Intent Due February 4; Application Due March 4

Description:
The purpose of this exploratory/developmental grant program is to foster research on research integrity in areas of research that have little published data. The proposed project must challenge existing paradigms, be developed around an innovative hypothesis or address critical barriers to progress in understanding the multiple factors that underlie deviation from integrity in research. The sponsoring agencies are particularly interested in research focused on integrity in research that will provide clear evidence (rates of occurrence and impacts) of problem areas in community standards, self-regulation, practice norms, and non-adherence to accepted codes of conduct. The application must address the societal, organizational, group, or individual factors that affect integrity in research, both positively and negatively. Applications must have relevance to health sciences research including, for example, those biomedical, behavioral health sciences, or health services research areas having particular positive or negative research integrity issues. Applicants must address problems or issues that have relevance to the specific interests of ORI or NIH Institutes and Centers.

A great deal has been written about integrity in research and its importance; however, published research data are lacking in many areas. The primary areas of interest for this FOA are: Research Integrity and the Public Trust, Research Integrity and Bias, Research Integrity in Community-Based Participatory Research, and Research Integrity and Factors Affecting Researchers' Behavior.

In addition to these primary interests, there is a continuing interest in the following areas: factors that enhance integrity; standards for responsible conduct; self-regulation; and economic, policy, and scientific impacts.

Relevant research perspectives and health-related disciplines include: anthropology, applied philosophy, behavioral economics, biomedical informatics, business, economics, education, information studies, law, organizational studies, health services, political science, psychology, public health, sociology, and survey and evaluation research, plus the physical, biomedical, and clinical sciences. Approaches from the social, behavioral, cognitive and affective neurosciences; and neuroeconomics also are encouraged.

The evolution and vitality of the biomedical sciences require a constant infusion of new ideas, techniques, and points of view. These may differ substantially from current thinking or practice and may not yet be supported by substantial preliminary data. By using the R21 mechanism, the NIH seeks to foster the introduction of novel scientific ideas, model systems, tools, agents, targets, and technologies that have the potential to substantially advance biomedical research.

Edmond J. Safra Research Lab Fellowships and Projects

Granting Institution: Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: varies
Due Date: February 15, 2011

Description:
In 2009, the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics led by director Lawrence Lessig launched a five-year research project to study the causes and consequences of institutional corruption. We define institutional corruption to be an economy of influence that either weakens public trust of a public institution, or weakens the effectiveness of the institution in achieving its purpose. The project is being conducted by the Edmond J. Safra Research Lab. The aim of the Lab is to study institutional corruption with both an empirical and normative focus. The empirical research project will explore whether and when institutional corruption exists. The normative project will develop tools to address institutional corruption when it is found to exist.

The cross-disciplinary format of the Lab is designed to foster an innovative research environment where both research and practice-oriented fellows are encouraged to weave their ideas into a broader framework, while also being a resource for each other. The Lab fellows vary based on methodological approach and topic of focus. Some examples of projects from the 2010-11 fellows include: documenting financial ties between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatric treatment boards, determining what psychological factors predict whether whistleblowers will be praised or rejected, and understanding the interaction of policy and daily attitudes towards risk in the financial industry. Research from the Lab is conducted with future real-world applications in mind. As the project evolves, the Lab plans to release databases, guidelines, and other tools to the public that work towards solving the problem of institutional corruption in a variety of contexts.

The Lab would be particularly enthusiastic to receive proposals addressing issues such as conflicts of interest, public trust of institutions, and institutional discrimination. Priority will be given to project proposals with an empirical focus that explore whether and when institutional corruption exists. Applicants may be from the fields of law, medicine, economics, psychology, sociology, business, or public policy, though those from other disciplinary homes will also be considered if their projects relate to institutional corruption. Projects not directly contributing to the mission of the Lab's work on institutional corruption will not be considered.

The Center typically accepts both full-time residential fellows and part-time nonresidential fellows. In addition the Lab funds outside projects that address institutional corruption. As a part of the Lab community, residential fellows will spend a majority of their time working on their research projects, while also benefiting from being part of a multidisciplinary and highly- interactive group of fellows. Fellows primarily engage through a weekly Lab seminar that enables them to workshop their own projects, while also building a collaborative framework to address institutional corruption. Part-time nonresidential fellows will be invited a few times during the year to participate and engage with the rest of the fellows.

Pfizer Fellowships in Bioethics

Granting Institution: Pfizer
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Up to $100,000, paid over two years at $50,000 per year
Due Date: February 11, 2011

Description:
In recent decades, bioethics has emerged as a priority within medical education institutions and among ethics educators. Many factors account for this greater emphasis on bioethics, including major developments in science and technology, such as advances in stem cell research, significant societal changes, a better-educated public, and increased public attention to issues of patient rights and patient empowerment. The Fellowship in Bioethics provides an opportunity for researchers to explore ethical issues that arise in the everyday practice of contemporary medicine.

Institutions interested in this fellowship program should submit research proposals for programs and initiatives centered on issues such as doctor-patient confidentiality, genetic testing, stem cell research, professional boundaries, conflicts of interest, informed consent for treatment and research, and end-of-life care.

W.E.B. Du Bois Fellowship Program

Granting Institution: U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Up to $100,000
Due Date: March 22, 2011

Description:
W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963) was an early leader in the struggle for racial equality in the United States. As a social scientist, Du Bois used objective methods to challenge discriminatory ideologies and institutions to advocate for social change. His classic study "The Philadelphia Negro," published in 1899, was a groundbreaking sociological study of the city's black community, one of the first research projects to combine urban ethnography, social history, and descriptive statistics.

The Fellowship places particular emphasis on crime, violence, and the administration of justice in diverse cultural contexts within the United States. The W.E.B. Du Bois Fellowship Program's objective is to provide talented researchers with a terminal degree in any academic discipline, an opportunity, early in their career, prior to the award of tenure, to elevate independently generated research and ideas to the level of national discussion. The Du Bois Fellow is expected to meet all reporting requirements as well as deliver a final report.

Recognizing the dynamic influence of community factors on crime, violence, and justice, and in the tradition of the work of W.E.B. Du Bois, NIJ's W.E.B. Du Bois Fellowship Program seeks to advance the field of knowledge regarding the confluence of crime, justice, and culture in various societal contexts. The 2011 Du Bois Fellow will focus on a criminal-justice-relevant policy question in a manner that reflects its saliency as an integral part of the American past, present, and, increasingly, the future. The Fellowship places particular emphasis on crime, violence, and the administration of justice in diverse cultural contexts. Any research funded under this solicitation should have direct implications for criminal justice policy and practice in the United States.

Researchers may choose from, but are not limited to, the following list of broad topic areas:

• Courts, sentencing, probation, institutional corrections, and parole: Determine the influence of race, ethnicity, gender, and culture on prosecutorial charging decisions, sentencing practices, and disparities in representation; consider the needs of diverse populations within the correctional system and current programmatic responses addressing rehabilitation and offender reintegration in situations where race, gender, or culture may prove relevant.

• Police-community relations: Consider the impact of race, ethnicity, gender and culture on law enforcement effectiveness and perceptions of justice; weigh factors of language, culture, and socio-historical perceptions of law enforcement as these issues affect the ability of police—as individuals and organizations—to serve communities.

• Civil rights: Research the preservation of civil rights as juxtaposed to the preservation of public safety, order, and the administration of justice.

• Immigration, crime, and victimization: Examine incidents of crime, hate crime, violence, and victimization within immigrant populations; justice system responses; justice system innovations addressing the needs of immigrant populations; and illegal immigration, with a focus on law enforcement issues and the administration of justice in the United States.

• Culture and Crime: Investigate crime, violence, substance abuse, and justice system interactions in particular cultural settings; explore the role of race, ethnicity, and culture- specific norms within particular cultural contexts; consider implications for further knowledge development and the development of policies and programmatic responses that take these factors into account.

Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE)

Granting Institution: National Science Foundation (NSF)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Up to $300,000 (up to $400,000 for collaborative proposals for the purpose of disseminating best practices in graduate ethics education)
Due Date: March 14, 2011; March 01 annually, thereafter

Description:
The Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE) program aims to deepen the understanding of ethical dilemmas in science and engineering, and provide cutting edge, effective research and educational materials to train the next generation of scientists and engineers. The EESE program accepts proposals for innovative research and educational projects to improve ethics education in all of the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports, including within interdisciplinary, inter-institutional and international contexts. Proposals must focus on improving ethics education for graduate students in those fields or on developing summer post-baccalaureate ethics-education activities or other activities that transition students from undergraduate to graduate education. The Principal Investigator team should be truly multi- disciplinary, and involve people with different disciplinary backgrounds.

The program will entertain proposals in graduate ethics education in science and engineering generally and will continue to support exploration of new ethical questions in engineering, biology, computer science, and other fields. Priority areas include but are not limited to:

• global/international challenges in science and engineering ethics;
• a general framework for the ethics of emerging technologies;
• issues of privacy and confidentiality in relation to data mining;
• fields for which there are few resources in ethics education or research;
• ethical issues related to robotics;
• intersection of the choices that society makes between natural resource development and utilization (e.g., energy sources) and environmental consequences;
• ethical issues associated with natural hazards, risk management, decision-making and the role of scientists in defining and negotiating the consequences of natural hazards in the face of scientific uncertainties.

Proposals should contribute to a theory of ethics education in science and engineering-one that addresses the individual motivators, societal incentives, and cultural beliefs that lead to ethical dilemmas. Many forms of expertise (e.g. philosophy, social science, engineering, life sciences) have contributed to the study of ethics in science and engineering. This diverse and often separate research provides an important empirical base that researchers can use to develop a theoretical approach to ethics education. The EESE program welcomes proposals that aim to contribute to theory building as part of the proposed research or education project.

The EESE program is interested in encouraging innovative research and education projects likely to create long-term improvement in ethics education for graduate students in science and engineering. EESE invites proposals for research projects, education projects, and combinations of the two.

Research projects that examine ethics education for graduate students in science and engineering are eligible for consideration in EESE. Research projects should suggest and explore creative, original, or potentially transformative concepts. The expectation is that project results will help in developing better ethics-education programs for graduate students; thus, proposals should specify plans to deliver findings to appropriate research and educational communities and assist them to implement projects or programs based on the findings. Research projects may also include a focus on ethical issues arising in educational research or in ethics education for graduate students.

Education projects must be based on research findings or theory that indicate successful ways to enhance ethics education for graduate students. They may include a wide range of activities such as mentoring programs, infrastructure-development activities, faculty capacity- building activities, training of postdoctoral fellows to implement programs, and graduate-student involvement in program development. The EESE program encourages applicants who think creatively about ethics education, and go well beyond standard approaches such as developing online modules, providing students with a series of scenarios and having a discussion about them, or holding workshops and seminars with invited speakers, and then asking students to rate the activities on a survey form. Projects to develop and test creative, new materials or tools or teaching techniques are also eligible. Such materials or tools should go beyond existing materials; they should take ethics education into new pedagogical strategies or topics.

A common, often-effective approach in educational projects is to develop graduate-student programs. Another approach may focus on improving the ability of faculty to mentor students or create ethics-education programs and materials in collaboration with graduate students. A national or international training activity for graduate students would be yet another appropriate strategy.

EESE education projects should test the feasibility and effectiveness of their activities or programs in more than one institution, incorporate ways to diffuse project activities even further, and evaluate project effectiveness, including assessment of expected student outcomes. Proposals are expected to include substantial and persuasive information about how this will be done. Proposals should specify plans to disseminate findings widely. Collaborations with appropriate professional associations are encouraged in this regard.

Proposals may also combine research and education components. For instance, the first year of a project might examine ethics education for graduate students in a scientific or engineering field. The second year might implement programs on several campuses based on what was discovered. Repetition and modification, evaluation and diffusion might occur during the third year.

EESE awardees should also offer their findings and curriculum to the Ethics in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Online Resource Center. The Ethics Online Resource (NSF Award#1045412) aims to provide ethics curriculum, best practices for ethics education and training, encyclopedia entries, and other resources.

Arts & Humanities Research Enhancement Program

Granting Institution: UNL Office of Research
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Full Information File: Arts & Humanities Research Enhancement Program RFP
Award: up to $10,000 (a minimum of 25% if total budget must be supplied by the department and/or college)
Due Date: November 11, 2009 @ noon

Description:
The Arts and Humanities Research Enhancement Program is designed to foster research, scholarship and creative activity in the arts and humanities to support excellence in these disciplines and to increase competitiveness for external grants. Arts and Humanities will be interpreted in their broadest sense.

Although external research dollars in the arts and humanities are in shorter supply than in the sciences and engineering, the philosophy is the same. That is, with seed money to achieve short term goals, faculty can increase their chances of obtaining external funding for longer term projects. Faculty should present their long-term plan for creative activity/research, and specifically describe how the project will lead to external funding, including a targeted plan for external funding applications.

Given the strong interest nationally for interdisciplinary work, projects involving collaborations between Arts & Humanities faculty and faculty outside the Arts & Humanities are encouraged.

Scope of the Award:

 •  A&H awards may be made for initiation of a new project, new areas of faculty research/creative activity, and/or further development of an on-going longer term project. All projects must present long-term research goals of the applicant(s) and specifically describe how the seed funds will help the applicant to achieve the stated long-term goals and to enhance competitiveness for external funding. Projects that facilitate cross-disciplinary faculty collaboration are encouraged.

 •  A&H funds from the Office of Research cannot be used for faculty salary but may be used for student salaries. Matching funds from departments/colleges may be considered for faculty salary.

 •  Funds may not be used for remodeling or alteration of facilities or for core facilities.

 •  Awards may not be used to replace current funding.

 •  A&H Seed Grant applicants must specifically identify sources of departmental, center, and/or college matching funds (25% required). In-kind matching funds that are part of normal operations (such as office space, standard computer use, and departmental clerical support) are not allowed. Funds previously awarded from the Office of Research (such as Research Council or Layman Funds) cannot be used as departmental or college matching funds.

Strategic Research Cluster Grants

Granting Institution: UNL Office of Research
Program Website: Funding Information Page
Full Information File: Strategic Research Cluster Grants RFP
Award: up to $50,000 for one year
Due Date: Rolling Deadline

Description:
The overall goal of the Strategic Research Cluster Grant program is to foster and support interdisciplinary research groups at UNL in developing their competitiveness for large-scale grants. This goal will be accomplished through funding of research clusters targeting specific federal agency programs that offer programmatic, multi-million dollar funding.

Research clusters that build collaborations across departments, colleges and campuses, and with other institutions of strategic importance are critical to enhancing our competitiveness. These partnerships should emerge naturally from shared research interests and needs, and take into account funding opportunities, institutional history, academic priorities and UNL's unique strengths. This initiative offers competitive grant funding to encourage the development and success of such partnerships.

 •  Research cluster grants are NOT meant to provide seed funding for proposal development by small teams, as there are other internal mechanisms to support these projects (e.g., Research Council funding). This program is intended to build capacity and support development of large scale projects and centers.

 •  Funds must be used to support interdisciplinary groups of researchers whose research targets an area where there is a known opportunity for obtaining competitive federal funding. The outcome expected is submission of a proposal for center, program project or other large-scale research grant of $500,000 or more per year, for three or more years (exceptions to this funding level may be considered in unique circumstances).

 •  Funds may not be used for remodeling or alteration of facilities or for core facilities.

 •  Awards may not be used to replace current funding.

 •  Tenure leading/tenured faculty salary may not be requested. Funds may be used for salary for non-tenure-track research positions, post-doctoral positions, graduate students and technical personnel for no more than a two-year appointment.

Research Council Interdisciplinary Research Grants

Granting Institution: UNL Office of Research, Research Council
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: typically, up to $20,000 for one year
Due Dates: Deadline Passed, Check Back for Next Year's Deadline

Description:
Awards will be for supporting new initiatives in interdisciplinary research, creative and scholarly activities to increase competitiveness of groups in applying for external funding and could also serve as ideas for future development for strategic initiatives.

Typically, awards do not exceed $20,000 for one year. However, in an effort to encourage ambitious proposals and truly multi-disciplinary initiatives, the Research Council is now accepting requests for larger amounts of funding. Awards may be renewed competitively for one additional year. Faculty salaries are not allowed in the budget. The proposal should clearly identify the new area to be explored and how the project employs collaborative strategies. The research should be a timely topic and the proposal should identify the potential sources of future external funding and the likelihood of obtaining such funding. Recipients are required to submit a proposal for competitive external funding within 12 months of the end of the Interdisciplinary Research Grant period.

Evaluation Guidelines

Commonly Asked Questions

The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship

Granting Institution: The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: In the 2009 Newcombe competition, 29 Fellows received $24,000 for 12 months of full-time dissertation writing; in addition, their graduate schools were asked to waive tuition and/or remit some portion of their fees.
Due Dates: Competition Has Passed: Check Back for Next Year’s Competition
Opening Date: Competition Has Passed: Check Back for Next Year’s Competition

Description:
The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships are designed to encourage original and significant study of ethical or religious values in all fields of the humanities and social sciences, and particularly to help Ph.D. candidates in these fields complete their dissertation work in a timely manner. In addition to topics in religious studies or in ethics (philosophical or religious), dissertations appropriate to the Newcombe Fellowship competition might explore the ethical implications of foreign policy, the values influencing political decisions, the moral codes of other cultures, and religious or ethical issues reflected in history or literature.

Eligibility/Application Information
FAQ's

Science, Technology, and Society (STS) Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants

Granting Institution: National Science Foundation (NSF)
Program Solicitation Website: Funding Information Page
Award: up to $10,000 for Research in North America or $15,000 for International Research
Due Dates: February 1, August 1

Description:
STS considers proposals that examine historical, philosophical, and sociological questions that arise in connection with science, engineering, and technology, and their respective interactions with society. STS has four components:
1. Ethics and Values in Science, Engineering and Technology (EVS)
2. History and Philosophy of Science, Engineering and Technology (HPS)
3. Social Studies of Science, Engineering and Technology (SSS)
4. Studies of Policy, Science, Engineering and Technology (SPS).

The components overlap, but are distinguished by the different scientific and scholarly orientations they take to the subject matter, as well as by different focuses within the subject area. STS encourages the submission of hybrid proposals that strive to integrate research involving two or more of these core areas. (For further information regarding these areas, see the STS program description above, or the program solicitation website.)

These awards provide funds for dissertation research expenses not normally available through the student's university. The dissertation advisor is the principal investigator on these proposals; the doctoral student should be listed as co-principal investigator.

Dissertation proposals should be prepared in accordance with the guidelines for regular research proposals. (See the NSF Grant Proposal Guide or NSF Grants.gov Application Guide and the instructions and additional items listed below.) The Project Description section should describe the scientific significance of the work, including its relationship to other current research, and the design of the project in sufficient detail to permit evaluation. It should present and interpret progress to date if the research is already underway.

Awards are not intended to cover the full costs of a student's doctoral dissertation research. Funds may be used only for valid research expenses which include, but are not limited to, conducting field research in settings away from campus that would not otherwise be possible, data collection and sample survey costs, payments to subjects or informants, specialized research equipment, analysis and services not otherwise available, supplies, travel to archives, special collections or seminars, and facilities or field research locations, and partial living expenses for conducting necessary research away from the student's university. Funds are to be used exclusively for the actual conduct of dissertation research. These funds may not be used as a student stipend, for tuition, textbooks, journals, or for the typing, reproduction, or publication costs of the student's dissertation. Funds may be requested for research assistants only in very special circumstances, which should be carefully justified.

Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in Bioethics

Granting Institution: The Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: two-year fellowship; stipends are based on the current US government schedule
Due Date: January 15

Description:
The Department of Bioethics of the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, NIH, is offering a limited number of pre-doctoral fellowship positions in bioethics.

The Department of Bioethics is committed to clinical teaching, consultation, and research. Fellows will participate in the activities and intellectual life of the department, and study ethical issues related to the conduct of research, clinical practice, and health policy. Fellows will conduct their research under the guidance of the senior faculty, participate in weekly bioethics seminars, case conferences, ethics consultations, and IRB deliberations, and have access to multiple educational opportunities at NIH.

Applicants should have an undergraduate degree and should be planning postgraduate work. Fellows will be selected on the basis of their previous academic achievements, commitment to scholarship, and the contribution they are likely to make in the field of bioethics. No prior experience in bioethics is necessary.

Interested applicants should submit an application including a curriculum vitae, a brief statement describing their interests and goals for the fellowship (1,000 words or less), three letters of reference, copies of written or published work, and transcripts.

Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Bioethics

Granting Institution: The Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: two-year fellowship; stipends are based on past experience and the current US government schedule
Due Date: December 30

Description:
The Department of Bioethics of the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, NIH, is offering a limited number of post-doctoral fellowship positions in bioethics.

The Department of Bioethics is committed to clinical teaching, consultation, and research. Fellows will participate in the activities and the intellectual life of the department and study ethical issues related to conduct of research, clinical practice, and health policy. Fellows will conduct their research under the guidance of senior faculty, participate in weekly bioethics seminars, case conferences, ethics consultations, and IRB deliberations, and have access to multiple educational opportunities at the NIH.

Applicants should have a PhD, MD, JD, or other advanced degree in a relevant field. Fellows will be selected on the basis of their previous academic or professional achievements, commitment to scholarship, and the contribution they are likely to make in the field of bioethics. No prior experience in bioethics is necessary.

Interested applicants should submit an application including a curriculum vitae, a brief statement describing their interests and goals for the fellowship (1,000 words or less), three letters of reference, copies of written or published work, and transcripts.

Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography Student Award

Granting Institution: Getty Images
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $5,000
Due Date: March 1

Description:
We believe that photojournalism is a powerful tool for telling compelling social, political and cultural stories. We also understand that creating and managing world-class photography assignments requires time, freedom, support and considerable resources. We award four student grants of $5,000 per year to photojournalism students under the age of 30 and currently enrolled in photojournalism courses at an accredited college or university.

Application Submission Guidelines: Download PDF

FAQ: Download PDF

The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Dissertation Fellowships

Granting Institution: The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $15,000
Due Date: February 1

Description:
The foundation welcomes proposals from any of the natural and social sciences and the humanities that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence, aggression, and dominance. Highest priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence, aggression, and dominance in the modern world.

Ten or more dissertation fellowships are awarded each year to individuals who will complete the writing of the dissertation within the award year. These fellowships of $15,000 each are designed to contribute to the support of the doctoral candidate to enable him or her to complete the thesis in a timely manner, and it is only appropriate to apply for support for the final year of Ph.D. work. Applications are evaluated in comparison with each other and not in competition with the postdoctoral research proposals. Applicants may be citizens of any country and studying at colleges or universities in any country.

Particular questions that interest the foundation concern violence, aggression, and dominance in relation to social change, the socialization of children, intergroup conflict, interstate warfare, crime, family relationships, and investigations of the control of aggression and violence. Research with no useful relevance to understanding and attempting to cope with problems of human violence and aggression will not be supported, nor will proposals to investigate urgent social problems where the foundation cannot be assured that useful, sound research can be done. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources.

The Problem of Evil in Contemporary and Modern Thought Dissertation Fellowship

Granting Institution: The University of Notre Dame Center for the Philosophy of Religion, The John Templeton Foundation
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $25,000 Fellowship Award, plus up to $5,000 for relocation, travel, and research.
Due Date: January 15, 2011 & January 15, 2012

Description:
The University of Notre Dame, the Center for the Philosophy of Religion and The John Templeton Foundation, are pleased to announce two sets of dissertation fellowships for 2011- 2013:

  • Templeton Dissertation Fellowships Program in Early Modern Philosophy of Religion and Theology

  • Templeton Dissertation Fellowships Program in Evil, Pain and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind

The Templeton Dissertation Fellowships Program in Early Modern Philosophy of Religion and Theology will award several dissertation fellowships to scholars devoted to inquiry into the problem of evil as it is treated in early modern philosophy of religion and/or theology. Fellowships are aimed at dissertation research which provides new insights into the way in which the nature and reality of evil were treated in the distinctive intellectual culture of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, characterized as it was by distinctive intellectual trends including the maturation of the Reformation, the rise of modern science, etc.

The Templeton Dissertation Fellowships Program in Evil, Pain and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind funds research focused on the nature of pain and suffering among non- human animals, especially as that pain and suffering bears relevance to the problem of evil.

The Templeton Dissertation Fellows will receive one-year awards with the possibility of a second year renewal in 2011, and one-year awards in 2012. Fellows will spend their time in residence at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, IN, interacting with leading scholars in early modern philosophy of religion and theology, contemporary philosophy of religion and contemporary philosophy of mind, for the purpose of undertaking cutting-edge doctoral research on their topic.

The University of Notre Dame provides unique opportunities for sustained contact with scholars in philosophy of religion, theology, and early modern philosophy—contacts which not only can be quite helpful but, in the case of some topics, are the necessary prerequisites for excellent scholarship in the field.

Sample Projects

Pulliam/Kilgore Freedom of Information Internships

Granting Institution: The Society of Professional Journalists
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: Interns receive a stipend of $400 per week and work during a mutually agreeable 10-week period during the summer.
Due Date: January 14, 2011

Description:
The Society of Professional Journalists annually awards two Pulliam/Kilgore Freedom of Information Internships. One intern works in the offices of the Society's First Amendment legal counsel in Washington, D.C. The other intern works at the Society's National Headquarters in Indianapolis.

The interns research and write about freedom of information issues while assisting the Society's Freedom of Information Committee and First Amendment legal counsel in preparing SPJ's annual Freedom of Information Report. Other responsibilities may include working on the SPJ Web site and assisting with SPJ programs and initiatives.

Applicants must be journalism students who are entering or just completing their senior year, a graduate journalism student, or a law student with a journalism background.

About the SPJ Headquarters Internship
The intern selected to work at the Society's National Headquarters in Indianapolis writes for the Freedom of Information issue of Quill magazine, published annually in September. Candidates for this position should possess a strong background in writing and reporting.

  • Updating comprehensive contact lists for federal and state agencies

  • Working on other FOI-related projects of the Society

  • Attending and assisting with various SPJ Headquarters-related events

About the Washington, D.C., Internship
The intern selected to work in the law offices of Baker & Hostetler – the Society's First Amendment legal counsel in Washington, D.C. – primarily works on researching and writing SPJ's annual Pulliam/Kilgore Report. The report addresses a Freedom of Information topic of interest to journalists and attorneys. The 5,000- to 6,000-word report is distributed at the Society's National Convention. Candidates for this position should possess a strong background in law or be able to demonstrate a solid interest in law and the ability to conduct the responsibilities required.

Other duties of the Washington, D.C., intern include:

  • Writing stories for Quill magazine

  • Attending hearings on Capitol Hill that are of interest to SPJ

  • Representing SPJ at various Washington, D.C., events

NIJ Ph.D. Graduate Research Fellowship Program

Granting Institution: The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ); Office of Justice Programs (OJP); National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Program Announcement Website: Funding Information Page
Award: $25,000
Due Date: February 28, 2011

Description:
The NIJ Ph.D. Graduate Research Fellowship (GRF) program provides awards for research on crime, violence, and other criminal justice-related topics to accredited universities that support graduate study leading to research-based doctoral degrees. NIJ invests in doctoral education by supporting universities that sponsor students who demonstrate the potential to successfully complete doctoral degree programs in disciplines relevant to the mission of NIJ. Applicants sponsoring doctoral students in policy and health sciences or in an education field are eligible to apply only if the doctoral research dissertation is in an NIJ-supported discipline (i.e., social and behavioral sciences, operations technology, information and sensors research and development, and investigative and forensic sciences).

The GRF program is intended to support universities that sponsor students who are in the final stages of graduate study. Awards are granted to successful applicants in the form of a grant to cover a doctoral student fellowship.

Universities are encouraged to sponsor outstanding and promising doctoral students whose dissertation prospectus demonstrates independent and original research that has direct implications for criminal justice in the United States.

Successful applicants must clearly demonstrate how the proposed dissertation research advances basic criminal justice knowledge, practice, and/or policy for criminal justice agencies in the United States. Quantitative, qualitative, primary, and secondary data analysis studies are encouraged. Special consideration will be given to applicants who use the most rigorous research methods applicable to their proposed research topic to maximize the validity and reliability of findings.